Does running worsen varicose veins on legs?

Not really. Running/walking activates the calf muscle pump which propels the blood return from the legs. The exercise activity dilates the vv and makes them more prominent and may result in increased sensitivity and the use of compression hose will lessen the discomfort. Running will not worsen the vv, but standing, sitting long periods will do so.
Difficult to say . I do see a lot of hard core athletes get reflux in their ssv this may be due to muscle hypertrophy blocking the ssv from emptying. But as the other doc stated muscle helps propel blood flow back to heart. I think this needs to be further studied.
Sort of. Generally, exercise is good for veins. Many times runners who have slender legs will develop very prominent veins that are normal. Veins enlarge because of their need to return more blood from your legs to your heart when you exercise. When you already have bad veins, exercise can sometimes make your legs feel worse. The real issue, though, in developing varicose veins is heredity, not exercise.
Running. aerobic activity is helpful however with ing=creased muscle mass veins may become more prominent without vein varicose support hose during running may be of benefit also at times hard core running may cause blood flow to reflux fro the deep veinss to the superficial system causing a varicose vein.
Running ; veins. If you are predisposed to vein disease and run, the impact at foot strike generates significant torque transmitted to venous valves in the legs. Since these valves are genetically likely to fail, you may be accelerating the process. It is unknown what if any protective effect compression provides. Walking at incline can generate similar mets of exercise with less risk.

Related Questions

Does running slowly worsen varicose veins on legs?

No. This activity has no effect on the varicose veins. Wear support stockings and if concerned, see your pcp for advise on further options. Don't stop exercising unless it is just too uncomfortable. Read more...
No. Varicose veins in the legs are caused by valvular disruption in the superfical veins, dvts, or deep vein insufficiency. ( their must be increased pressure in the veins for varicosities to form) running slowly has no effect. I do see alot of athelets get varicose veins in their calves however. So there may be some correlation between varicosites and atheletes but not running slowly. Read more...
More prominent. As dr. Mountcastle said, there may be a posssibility that running can slowly worsen varicose veins on your legs. Often runners have slender legs with very little subcutaneous tissue. As a result, the veins on runners' legs can be more visible and sometimes look like they are varicose but, in actuality, they are completely normal. Read more...
VV and exercise. Varicose veins are due to malfunctioning (refluxing) valves of the saphenous system. Contraction of the calf muscles increases the venous return to reduce the venous hypertension and this is good for the veins. Running, however, because of the jarring and pounding of the legs on the ground can actually worsen varicose veins by the increased pressure on the valves. Non pounding exercise is best. Read more...
Varicose veins. running is not a problem and the speed has no bearing however increased aerobic activity can cause the veins to work harder so use of a support or compression stocking after ta aid in recovery would be beneficial. Read more...

Does running slowly worsen varicose veins on your legs?

No. The speed of running does not make a difference. Any exercise will help the venous circulation of the legs regardless of the speed. Read more...
Yes, running worsens. Running can damage weak one way valves within leg veins, worsening varicose veins. It is not how fast you run but how hard you slam your foot down. This generates tremendous torque on the valves, leading to damage and failure, the veins subsequently dilate. Walking is much more beneficial. Read more...
Not the speed. As drs. Farhy and presant said, pounding, more than speed, might have an influence on your veins and make them worse. Low impact exercise (biking, walking, swimming, etc.) is likely better. The most important thing though is that you exercise, regardless of what you do. Read more...

What is the definition or description of: Varicose veins on legs?

Bulging Veins. Varicose veins are bulging grape-like appearing veins which are most commonly seen on the legs. These are due to leaking(refluxing) valves usually in the saphenous system. Some causes include hereditary, pregnancy, trauma and aging. The gold standard of treatment is to have a venous reflux ultrasound to both diagnose and form a treatment plan. You should see a vein specialist. Read more...
Varicose veins. Varicose veins are enlarged (dilated) sections of veins which are located just under the surface of the skin - usually on the leg. They are often easy to see, as they look thick and knobbly. They may be less obvious if you are overweight, as they are hidden by fatty tissue under the skin. http://patient.info/health/varicose-veins-leaflet. Read more...

How can you prevent varicose veins in legs?

No:can slow progress. No we can't prevent but we can slow down. Environment increases our inherited disorder as well as hormones and pregnancy, prolonged standing, prolonged sitting, heat, heavy weight lifting, age, sedimentary job, etc. Wear prescription strength graduated compression stockings and get your veins repaired by a vein specialist: www.Phlebology.Org. Read more...
Things can help. The biggest risk factor for varicose is heredity. And you can't change your parents. . Pregnancy is a risk factor. Staying fit and active and close to your ideal weight may help. Avoid jobs where you are sitting or standing in one place. Wearing compression stockings may help but there is no solid evidence this works. Read more...
Cannot. It is not possible to completely prevent varicose veins. They are primarily related to hormones heredity and pregnancy and sometimes trauma. Staying in good general health is the best you can do. Read more...
Not totally possible. The main reason why people get varicose veins is heredity. So, unless you can change your grandparents, there really isn't a lot you can do about your risk of getting varicose veins. You can do things like avoiding standing for long periods of time, wearing graduated compression stockings, and getting regular exercise (which can minimize how bad your veins become) but you can't change heredity. Read more...

Can varicose veins cause really itching legs?

Yes they can. One of the more common symptoms of venous insufficiency and varicose veins is itching legs. Some also describe a heaviness of the legs and even restless legs at night. Read more...
Yes. Varicose vein symptoms can range widely from individual to individual. Itching is a common presenting symptom. Other symptoms include achiness, heaviness, dull pain, leg fatigue, swelling, restless legs, darkening of the skin, dermatitis, and throbbing. If you are developing any of these symptoms in conjunction with varicose vein disease, seek vascular surgeon opinion regarding treatment. Read more...
They can, but. a lot of things can cause itching legs. It would would be a little less common to have significant itching from varicose veins at 23 y/o, but it's certainly possible. An exam by a phlebologist (vein specialist) or a dermatologist would be the place to start to find a diagnosis. Read more...
Itching and veins. Although itching is not a common symptom of varicose veins, it does occur and is usually a result of the skin drying out from the engorged veins which can cause stasis (non movement) of the blood leading to stretching of the skin and resultant dryness. Topical creams such as aloe may help but the best treatment would be to see a vein specialist for a venous evaluation. Read more...
Varicose veins. Itchy sensation is very often a symptom as a result of blood leakage around the varicose vein.this causes an allergic response which causes the itching. Read more...

Why are the lower legs vulnerable to varicose veins?

Higher vein pressure. Veins enlarge in response to increased pressure. When veins do not work properly, gravity allows blood to back flow into the legs (reflux) when standing ,or even sitting with the legs dependent. This pressure results in dilation of abnormal veins---- varicose veins. Read more...
Lower leg veins. Usually varicose vein disease is genetically acquired. Weak vein valves progressively break as a result of venous insufficiency. Leg ultrasound often reveals venous reflux disease in veins called saphenous veins, which causes the development of the surface veins. After the vein valves break, abnormal high pressure develops in the leg veins. Gravity causes highest pressure in the lower legs. Read more...
Leg Veins. Varicose veins occur most commonly in the lower legs because when we are standing the pressure will increase in the veins of the legs if the valves in these veins are not functioning properly (reflux). The result is that the blood will back up and the veins will enlarge to cause varicose veins. This does not happen in the arms. Read more...

What can I do about varicose veins on my legs and face?

See Vein Specialist. A vein specialist is someone certified to treat veins by the American Board of Venous and Lymphatic Medicine. This person should be able to treat veins in all areas of the body. There are many alternatives for facial veins including laser, sclerotherapy and fine needle radio frequency. Leg veins can be treated by either sclerotherapy or laser. For the legs a venous ultrasound may be necessary. Read more...

How to treat varicose veins and dark patches on my legs?

Venous hypertension. Varicose veins may transmit high pressures to the surrounding tissues of the lower leg, causing discoloration of the skin. Later complications include thinning of the skin and ulcers. Conservative measures include avoiding standing for long periods, resting with legs elevated and wearing of compression stockings when up and about. Please consult your local practitioner for referral to surgeon. Read more...
Close leaking valves. Varicose veins are a result of malfunctioning valves usually in the saphenous system. The first step in treatment would be to obtain a venous reflux ultrasound to make the diagnosis and help plan treatment which could be laser or radiofreqency closure of the valves usually with microphlebectomies and possible sclerotherapy or ultrasound directed sclerotherapy. You should see a vein specialist. Read more...
Varicose veins. firstly need to be evaluated to determine the source of the varicose veins. This can be accomplished by a venous duplex ultrasound which will determine if there is reflux. The dark patches that you are experiencing are most likely related to these varicose veins as result of blood flow leakage at the lower portion of the leg. Use of support stockings during daily activities is recommended. Read more...

Will varicose veins in my legs go away at all if I lose weight?

Possibly improve. Because varicose veins swell with pressure, losing weight will help them possibly be less prominant. However, they are also due to damaged valves in the veins, and once those are damaged they cannot be repaired. However, there are many treatments for this - see your doctor for a recommendation to a vein specialist. Read more...
No. The symptoms that you are experiencing may improve but the veins will not go away until they been treated appropriately. Read more...
No. Weight loss is always a good idea, but drs. Salartash and neilsen are right. The best you can hope for with veins from weight loss is that the your vein related symptoms might improve. Unfortunately, once a vein valve is broken, it isn't fixable. Fortunately, fixing your broken valves isn't necessary. Treatment to make the veins go away is what is needed, whether you lose weight or not. Read more...
Varicose veins. once there weight loss wont help as there is already a defect in the vein of course loosing weight will work to prevent new varicose vein development. Read more...