How does Tenormin (atenolol) work?

Blocks adrenalin. Tenormin (atenolol) is a beta blocker. It blocks receptors that allow for a higher pulse rate and blocks the response to the body's own adrenalin. You get a slower pulse and less tremor. It is obviously more complicated than this, but this is the basics.

Related Questions

Atenolol is generic form of tenormin (atenolol). Why do I feel as though Tenormin (atenolol) works better and its stronger? Same 25MG on both. But definitely different.

Possible. Generics may be made by multiple manufacturers, and although the active chemical ingredient should be the same, fillers and delivery systems. although most modern day generics are virtually interchangeable with brand name drugs, in some cases, it is important to stick to the brand name, or at least try a generic from a different manufacturer. Read more...

I've been on atenolol 25mg daily split dose for 3 months. Works well for me. How long after I take the pill does it start actually reducing HR and BP?

Almost immediately. The pill works shortly after it has been taken even the first time. This will begin working within the first day but may take another day for some to be in your system. This is a long acting med and some is doing something most of the time. Read more...

Is it ok heart rate 86-92 3 hours after working out? I take 50mg atenolol. Heart rate in the 70's usually. Why when after work out stays a little high?

It's fine . Maybe you're a bit dehydrated but it's nothing to worry about. A better question might be: why are you even checking your pulse? Seems like you're over thinking this one. Be glad you're exercising and enjoy your day. . Read more...

26 in shape, one ep of SVT 2y ago atenolol 25 mg 2 a day, complete cardio check up rec all clear, getting strange sense of breathing during work outs?

See specialist. Get a second opinion, get more imaging. These sysmptoms are not typical for someone young as you. Consider changing atenolol to alternative medications to see if related. Read more...
Pulmonologist. If you've had a complete cardiological evaluation and all is normal, perhaps a pulmonary specialist could evaluate you and determine the cause of your exertional symptom. Read more...