I have tmj (temporomandibular joint dysfunction), and don't know how to get treatment for it.?

See OFP expert. TMJ pain patients can be treated with conservative, non-surgical and reversible procedures. See an Orofacial Pain specialist for consultation, imaging and diagnosis. They are the experts in this field.
A few things. Depends on symptoms, and cause of symptoms. 3 signs of TMJ dysfunction: joint noises, joint pain & limited oral opening. Self treat with soft diet, jaw exercises, massage, heat/cold, OTC pain meds. A splint or physical therapy would be next. Occasionally muscle relaxants, biofeedback. Xrays are done for diagnosis. Surgery usually reserved for serious symptoms not responsive to other treatments.
See a Dentist First. Common sense would suggest that you don't chew hard foods, massage the area, try hot/cold compresses, and take an anti-inflammatory medication, like ibuprofen. To figure out why you've got a problem, to make it better long-term, and to prevent bigger problems, you need to see a dentist. You may also need a team, including a physical therapist, massage therapist, chiropractor, etc. You need help.
TX can vary. The cause of your tmj/tmd, if known and the duration of your problem, may dictate the treatment. Often treatment for TMJ can vary from person to person and also may sometimes involve seeing other doctors. Physical therapy, tens, ultrasound therapy, exercises, and mouthpieces are the most standard types of treatment. You may need combinations of all.
Referral from your M. Tmj dysfunction is one of the most disabling problem , equally difficult to get permanent cure , your family physician will know who will be best for you .

Related Questions

I have tmj (temporomandibular joint dysfunction), and don't know how to get treatment for it. Tips?

See your dentist. Generally, tmd is treated by dentists and dental specialists. Usually the first stage of treatment is with an orthotic, similar to what is commonly called a "night guard". It may eventually involve orthodontics (braces), prosthetics (crowns and onlays), or other dental treatments. It's all about reducing the load on your joints (tmj's) so they can heal from damage already done. See a dentist. Read more...
A dentist. Start with your dentist to determine the cause of your tmj.. Grinding, clenching, loss of teeth, poor bite, etc, etc. Once the cause is determined, then appropriate treatment options can be discussed. Read more...
Schedule an exam. You need to schedule an exam with a dentist who is well versed in TMJ treatment. A good starting point would be to ask your dentist who they would recommend. You might also ask a friend if they had TMJ issues. In any case you want to do research as to credentials, success of treatments, background of the TMJ specialist. Not all are equal. Read more...
TX can vary. The cause of your tmj/tmd, if known and the duration of your problem, may dictate the treatment. Often treatment for TMJ can vary from person to person and also may sometimes involve seeing other doctors. Physical therapy, tens, ultrasound therapy, exercises, and mouthpieces are the most standard types of treatment. You may need combinations of all. Read more...
Specialist. Get expert advice and treatment. Oral surgeon, prosthodontist, orofacial pain specialist. . Self treat with soft diet, jaw exercises, massage, heat/cold, OTC pain meds. A splint or physical therapy would be next. Occasionally muscle relaxants, biofeedback. Xrays are done for diagnosis. Surgery usually reserved for serious symptoms not responsive to other treatments. Read more...

My jaw keeps clicking. Is this a symptom of TMJ (temporomandibular joint dysfunction)?

Yes. The clicking noise is made when you open or close your mandible, the noise come because the disk that covers the mandibular condyle is slipping off or if it s squeezed while the mandible is moving. This is not a normal condition of your joints. If you have pain you need to seek help and in general an occlusal guard professionally made can do the trick. Read more...
NO. A clicking in your jaw joint indicates that either the cartilage is out of place or the boney structures are altered. Neither issue indicates a dysfunctional condition. There are many people who have clicking in their jaw joints and they function very well with no pain or limitations. Read more...
Many. Symptoms of tmj/tmd can vary from person to person, severity, location and duration. It can affect the ears: ringing, aching, roaring, stuffiness, hearing loss; head, facial and neck: headaches, neck and facial pain; locking of the jaw: closed lock- limited opening, open lock- can't close; bite problems: can't touch the teeth, grinding, clenching; toothaches; lose teeth, fatigue, etc. Read more...

Is bruxism (teeth-grinding) & TMJ (temporomandibular joint dysfunction) related?

Definitely. Someone may grind their teeth for a number of reasons. Often, the problem occurs because the muscles of the face and jaw are trying to get the teeth in a comfortable position. The muscles may be in spasm, you may have a tmj/tmd problem, stress, infection. Best to see a dentist asap. Often thew cause is difficult to determine, so may have to treat the symptoms with a mouthpiece. Read more...
Bruxism. Sleep bruxism is classified as a sleep related movement disorder and is not related to the how the teeth fit together. It is sometimes thought that sleep bruxism is responsible for TMJ problems but the literature is non conclusive on that issue. Read more...
Yes. When you clench or grind you load your jaw joint and muscles in your cheek with a tremendous amount of pressure. This pressure can eventually lead to a tremendous pain in the joint. Clicking, limited opening, and pain can be troublesome and a dds should be consulted for help. Hope all is well. Read more...
Yes. Yes, Bruxism exacerbates TMD and can in some cases be causative. Read more...

What to do if I need clarification for my temporomandibular joint dysfunction or tmj. Please help!?

See a dentist. Have you been to a dentist and have you been diagnosed with tm dysfunction? If not, you should see a dentist to discuss your symptoms, have a thorough evaluation and then treatment options can be presented. Read more...
See your dentist . If you are experiencing issues with your jaw joint(s), you should see your dentist to have them evaluate your symptoms and prescribe a course of treatment. Tmj treatments vary widely depending upon the particular symptomology. Good luck! Read more...
Research. Tmj/tmd exhibits a multitude of symptoms. You can go to websites and read up on some of the common symptoms, but a thorough evaluation by a specialist is highly recommended. Some symptoms, such as an infected tooth, cysts, and other causes may mimic 'tmj.' my website, www.Jbassmantmj.Com shows a symptom list, but you really should be examined to rule TMJ or not. Read more...

What is temporomandibular joint dysfunction tmj?

Common problem. Tmj stands for temperomandibular joint, but is often used to describe tmd. The d stands for dysfunction. Tmd is an inflamation of the jaw joint. It can be arthritic with wear and tear on the cartilage and bone, or due to muscle spasm of the overlying muscles. Sometimes if feels like an earache, or a headache on the side of your head above the ear. Read more...
Jaw pain. The primary cause is muscular hyper- or parafunction, as in the case of bruxism, with secondary effects on the oral musculoskeletal system, like various types of displacement of the disc in the temporomandibular joint. The disorder and resultant dysfunction can result in significant pain, which is the most common tmd symptom, combined with impairment of function. Read more...
TMJ? Any dysfunction of the jaw joint. . 3 signs of TMJ dysfunction: joint noises, joint pain & limited oral opening. See an oral & maxillofacial surgeon for advice. Read more...

What causes temporomandibular joint dysfunction TMJ vs tmd?

Mostly the same. Tmj is the name of the place where the lower jaw (mandible) meets with the skull. Tmd is a disorder of that joint. It's caused by lots of things, including the forces of chewing and grinding one's teeth. If you think you have this, stop chewing gum and very chewy foods then start with simple measures like otc Ibuprofen and warm compresses. In the end, most need a custom guard to protect teeth. Read more...
Not much. Tmj is a layman's term, and refers to the joint itself. Tm dysfunction involves the joint and it's internal structures as well as external ones, the surrounding musculature and fascia of the face, neck, shoulders and back? It can becaused by a bad bite and is related to posture, vertebral alignment and head position as well. Also, it's associated with tooth clenching and grinding and migraines. Read more...
Same thing. These usually refer to the same thing. Tmd is the disfunction of the tmj, the jaw joint. They can be multiple contributing factors including trauma, poor growth patterns of the face, clenching the teeth, poor nutrition, and stress. Read more...
Anatomy. Tmj refers to the temporomandibular joints, where the upper bone (maxilla- temporal bone) and the lower jaw (mandible) meet and function...The joints. This is a simplistic description and you should look this up on the web for a more definitive anatomical answer. Better terms for symptoms associated with the TMJ mechanism are tmd (temporomandibular dysfunction, ) or TMJ syndrome. Read more...
A few things. Causes of TMJ syndrome are not completely understood.. Causes may include, misalignment (malocclusion) of or trauma to the teeth or jaw, teeth grinding (bruxism),, poor posture, stress or anxiety, arthritis or other inflammatory musculoskeletal disorders, excessive gum chewing. Treatment can be complex and beyond the scope of this answer. See a TMJ expert for guidance. Read more...
TMD or TMJ? The difference between TMD and TMJ. TMD refers to temporomandibular joint disease or temporomandibular joint, anatomical structure. Read more...

What is the best way to cure temporomandibular joint disorder TMJ or tmd?

Treatment. Tmj/tmd can be caused by stress and clenching or grinding of teeth. Sometimes tmd can occur without clinching or grinding. For "treatment" otc nsaids are good for a short amount of time as well as prescription steroids. If symptoms persist, you should be seen by on oral surgeon who specialized in tmd. A fitted mouth guard may be what you need. Read more...
Professional Help. Common sense would suggest that you don't chew hard foods, massage the area, try hot/cold compresses, and take an anti-inflammatory medication, like ibuprofen. To figure out why you've got a problem, to make it better long-term, and to prevent bigger problems, you need to see a dentist. You may also need a team, including a physical therapist, massage therapist, chiropractor, etc. You need help. Read more...
Varies with person. The way to cure tmd depends on the cause. Temporary help which may "cure" is to use an anti-inflammatory like Ibuprofen and icing along with a soft diet. The use of a healing laser can speed up the process. Stress may need stress management. An nti may be used. A bad bite needs correction which could include among other things bite adjustment, crowns, bridges, implants and braces. Read more...
Get a diagnosis. Many times tmd is self limiting and goes away on its own. If it does persist, see a dentist who can diagnose what is wrong. Tmd is not a diagnosis but a group of problems related to the jaw joint. Once a person has a diagnosis appropriate treatment can be discussed. Rarely does treatment involve extensive dental care or surgery. Read more...
No cure. Tmd/tmj syndrome can never really be cured, just maintained. Depending upon the cause, duration and severity, the symptoms may dictate what needs to be done treatment wise. Symptoms often recycle and come back, but knowledge of what to do and not to do is key. Read more...
A few things. Depends on symptoms, and cause of symptoms. 3 signs of TMJ dysfunction: joint noises, joint pain & limited oral opening. Self treat with soft diet, jaw exercises, massage, heat/cold, OTC pain meds. A splint or physical therapy would be next. Occasionally muscle relaxants, biofeedback. Xrays are done for diagnosis. Surgery usually reserved for serious symptoms not responsive to other treatments. Read more...

What are the common symptoms of temporomandibular joint dysfunction?

Several. Tmd or TMJ usually is a true joint disorder or a dental problem that refers pain to the side of the face (otalgia). The most common symptoms are a dull ache near the ear and clicking of the jaw joint. The problem is often seen by ENT doctors because of the referred pain to the side of the face that causes the patient to think the ear is involved. See a dentist for a diagnosis. Read more...
Long list. The list is long and varied. You need not have them all. You may find yourself clenching or grinding your teeth. You can have joint pain in front of your ear or an earache. Also, headaches & neck/shoulder painare common. Limited jaw opening or deviation on opening can occur. Tender or tight jaw, neck or shoulder muscles. Noise in jaw joints is common. Your jaw can get stuck open/closed. Read more...
TMJ Symptoms. Jaw pain, especially at area of the joint; popping/clicking of jaw; ear pain, or sounds of cracking in the ears: ringing/popping sounds in the ears (tinnitus) or a sense of fullness in the ears: headaches; blurred vision: tight, stiff, or sore jaw or neck muscles: facial pain, cheek pain, or chin numbness or tingling: shoulder pain; locking or dislocation of the jaw (usually after widely yawning). Read more...