6 doctors weighed in:

What are some reasons for a recurring stomach ache without nasuea?

6 doctors weighed in
Dr. Ruth Crystal
Obstetrics & Gynecology
3 doctors agree

In brief: Depends on location

It really depends where the "stomach ache" is.
If the pain goes away with tums/antacids it may be heartburn. If the pain is on the right near the rib cage it could be gallbladder or liver pain or it could just be the baby kicking. If you get a stomach ache lower down that is associated with your stomach/uterus getting hard, that is a contraction. Call your doctor to discuss the pain further.

In brief: Depends on location

It really depends where the "stomach ache" is.
If the pain goes away with tums/antacids it may be heartburn. If the pain is on the right near the rib cage it could be gallbladder or liver pain or it could just be the baby kicking. If you get a stomach ache lower down that is associated with your stomach/uterus getting hard, that is a contraction. Call your doctor to discuss the pain further.
Dr. Ruth Crystal
Dr. Ruth Crystal
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1 comment
Dr. Randall Bock
(unless you're not pregnant of course ;-)). In which case, pain lower down can be urinary tract infection, "colic", i.e. intestinal related (constipation, or indigestion)
Dr. Padmavati Garvey
Obstetrics & Gynecology
1 doctor agrees

In brief: Acid reflux

Acid reflux typically causes stomach pains without nausea.
Avoid onions, garlic, and tomatoes. Let at least three to four hours go by between your last meal for the day and when you go to bed.

In brief: Acid reflux

Acid reflux typically causes stomach pains without nausea.
Avoid onions, garlic, and tomatoes. Let at least three to four hours go by between your last meal for the day and when you go to bed.
Dr. Padmavati Garvey
Dr. Padmavati Garvey
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1 comment
Dr. Randall Bock
empiric therapy is quite useful, i.e. attempt treatment with liquid antacid. If that makes the pain go away you have essentially diagnosed the problem as acid - related, either GERD (gastroesophageal reflux disease, "heartburn"/esophagitis) or (more rarely) peptic ulcer.
Dr. Stevan Gonzalez
Internal Medicine

In brief: Requires evaluation

Abdominal pain can be caused by many conditions.
It is important to follow up with your primary health care provider. Understanding an individual's medical history, current symptoms, physical examination, and possibly additional testing are important for your physician to determine the appropriate management.

In brief: Requires evaluation

Abdominal pain can be caused by many conditions.
It is important to follow up with your primary health care provider. Understanding an individual's medical history, current symptoms, physical examination, and possibly additional testing are important for your physician to determine the appropriate management.
Dr. Stevan Gonzalez
Dr. Stevan Gonzalez
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