Would chronically high catecholamines inducing vasoconstriction result in reduced Cerebral Blood Flow and Hypoxia? Why or why not?

No. Hi. What do you mean by chronically high catecholamines? Do you have a pheochromocytoma or paraganglioma? Congestive heart failure? Please define what you call "chronically high catecholamines" (CHC). In no event would CHC cause hypoxia or reduced cerebral blood flow. Please provide meaningful information. Good luck and happy 2015!

Related Questions

What R the lasting effects of a years worth of reduced cerebral blood flow due to vasoconstriction? Does the lack of proper CBF result in cell death?

The long term effect. of "reduced" CBF due to TEMPORARY constriction of the vessels (as in migraine) are not really known but several studies have shown that even severe chronic migraine does not reduce flow sufficiently to damage brain cells! Hope this helps! Dr Z. Read more...

Is there anyway to see if cerebral blood flow is reduced when standing? Got dysautonomia and suspect cerebral vasoconstriction is too excessive

Dysautonomia. Dysautonomia syndrome causes different symptoms alleviated by avoidance of stimulants, ensuring hydration, using magnesium, vitamin D & omega fish oils (www.cardiamin.com, use code: CMC), low dose beta blockers e.g. propranolol 5 to 10mg 2 to 3 times daily and SSRIs e.g. citalopram 5 to 10mg daily. Read Dr. Ronald Hoffman’s MVP book (www.Amazon.com) and visit www.dysautonomiainternational.com. Read more...

Does chronic strong sympathetic nervous system overreaction from stimulant use result in meaningfully reduced cerebral blood flow?

See below. BOLD studies show reduced circulation and metabolic function in very specific areas of the prefrontal cortex and limbic system. It is unclear if the circulation reduction is primary vs a primary reduction of activity in those areas. Read more...