Are morphine tabs more addictive than methadone?

Not necessarily. The peak effect of immediate release morphine and sustained release morphine are different, so, for the addictive personality, the euphoric potential is different. When compared to methadone, only the sustained release formulation of morphine would theoretically be less addictive. The chronic use of either medication can lead to tolerance and dependence, both more common than addiction.

Related Questions

Are morphine tabs (msir) more addictive than methadone?

MS and methadone. I disagree. Both are potent narcotics that can activate the disease of addiction in susceptible patients. The physical withdrawal from Methadone is more prolonged than the withdrawal from morphone but they both can activate addiction. Methadone is used in substitution therapy for other opiate addictions because it gets across the blood-brain barrier more slowly and causes less euphoria & sedation. Read more...

I was just switched from 30mg morphine ER to 10mg methadone. I took the morphine this morning. When do I start the methadone?

Pain Control. Depends on what your doctor is trying yo do. If you and your doctor are trying to find medication that better control pain with less of the Narcotic effects or trying to get you off the morphine. I would wait till the next day to start the Methadone. Once you start the methadone, it means you do not take the Morphine anymore. Your Doctor will work with you to reach the appropriate dose. Read more...

Can u take 45mg morphine & 30mg of methadone as a break through med?

Not safe. Methadone is not for break through pain. Methadone overdose causes more deaths than any other narcotic. 45 mg of morphine is an awful of narcotic. This does not sound safe at all. Read more...

How effective is Methadone in managing Neuropathic Pain? It has less side effects than Morphine & more effective. Thx

It's effective. For a brief time then, many patients report loss of efficacy. So where do we go from there? There's actually no solid research to confirm which is universally accepted as showing methadone as unique or superior in pain management for neuropathy when comparing to less potent opioids. Have you truly been tried on every possible medication or cocktail of meds for the neuropathy? Tried BOTOX? Read more...
Methadone. has some properties for helping with neuropathic pain. Generally though opiates are poor neuropathic pain medications and are not typically recommended, however methadone may have better efficacy than other opiate medications. Given its long half life it can be a health crisis, because overdose can be problem. I would see a pain specialist to determine what might be appropriate for you. Read more...

Medical detox off methadone, morphine, lorazepam 2 get on Suboxone how do they keep you comfortable if benzos can't be used?

Other meds. Other meds are used for symptomatic relief. Clonidine for restlessness, Bentyl (dicyclomine) for stomach cramps, Flexeril for muscle cramps, etc. And you don't have to be in severe withdrawal to transition to suboxone. You should be in moderate withdrawal. Read more...
Anxiety Suboxone. It sounds like you've had trouble with benzo's if so you should not go back on them. People think there is an absolute contraindication for using benzo's with suboxone , there isn't. Anyone using suboxone should be in some talk therapy the talk therapy should be aimed at helping you calm down. The suboxone itself has a lot of calming attributes. Read more...

I am on a pain contract with my doctor. I am on methadone and vicodine. Will he be able to tell if I have taken morphine? When he tests my urine will he be able to tell that I have taken some morphine?

Hello. . Hello. Do you really expect physicians (hypocratic oath - first do no harm) to provide you with information to help beat your pain contract? Read more...
The . The physician-patient relationship is based on a few important principles, the most important of which is probably trust. Pain management doctors often have the unenviable position of treating their patients with very potent, and therefore very habit forming, medications. Opioid pain relievers like methadone, morphine, and hydrocodone (found in vicodin) are examples of such medications. Because they are so potent, they are frequently misused or abused, stolen, traded or sold. Problems arise because these medications cause sleepiness and stun the part of the brain that keeps us breathing when we are asleep. These medications also interact with many other prescription drugs, and with recreational drugs including alcohol. More accidental deaths are caused by these sorts of drugs than by recreational drugs. Doctors who prescribe these drugs are monitored very closely by agencies including the dea and their state medical boards. Although they are often not responsible for unwanted outcomes from the use of opioid medications, they are often held professionally and legally accountable for them. Pain management doctors routinely ask their patients to sign a contract agreeing to take only the medications prescribed by that doctor and only according to the doctor's instructions. This is done for at least three reasons: 1) to protect the patient's life; 2) to not ruin the system for other patients (such as could happen if the doctor's dea license was suspended); and, 3) to protect the doctor from lawsuits and professional sanctions. Doctors frequently test their patients to make sure that the contract is being followed. These days, the test can be very, very accurate and very, very broad. Read more...