With single vessel luminal (phenobarbital) narrowing coronary artery disease what percent requires angio?

CAD. If a suspicion of significant CAD is present (symptoms or abnormal stress study), angiography might be indicated. Intervention might be indicated if a blockage of greater than 70% is present.

Related Questions

Coronary artery disease. Single vessel disease 60% luminal (phenobarbital) narrowing. What should I do?

Get another test. Usually 70% is cutoff i would recommend having an intracoronay ultrasound or flow measurement via cardiac cath to determine real functional degree of obstruction. Read more...
Medical management . Medical management of cardiovascular risk factors in conjunction with your cardiologist. Read more...

Soft plaques at the proximal right coronary artery causing 30% luminal (phenobarbital) stenosis. What does thid mean?

Plaques. It means you have plaque in your coronary artery not obstructing flow a lot. It means aggressive diet, exercise, not smoking, BP control, lipid control, diabetes control all should be done to minimize progression of the plaque. Aspirin is also a good idea. Read more...

Please tell me might be possible to treat triple vessel coronary artery disease without having a surgical cabg?

Possible. Traditionally, triple vessel disease was treated with bypass surgery. Depending on the anatomy and the patient, multi-vessel stenting could be a reasonable option. Read more...
Less likely. Occasional stenting can be used. Need the whole history and exact anatomy of the coronaries, and other risk factors to make a recommendation. Read more...
Best option in most . Coronary artery bypass is considered the definitive treatment for triple vessel coronary disease. It may be possible to treat with stents, although outcomes have not typically been as good as surgery. The last choice is medical therapy which is not as good as either of the above options. Read more...

Can Triple vessel coronary artery disease treated with angioplasty and placement of stents?

Yes but, Depends on where the blocks are, how many, how complex and how long. Each case must be individualized. The more stents used the more likely the need for repeated procedures. Also with stents may need to take antiplatelet drugs for prolonged periods. Sometimes bypass better long term even though surgery is much harder on the patient. Need 2 discuss with cardiologist and heart surgeon b4 proceeding. Read more...
Angioplasty. The treatment of multivessel disease depends on many factors. If you have triple vessel disease you should discuss your status with your cardiologist and ask the options open to you. Read more...

Is it possible to treat triple vessel coronary artery disease without cabg?

Yes, possible, but.. ... it is very individualized. Many factors are considered, including age, symptoms, stress results, recent heart attack, presence of diabetes, heart muscle function, coronary anatomy. It's highly complex, even if it doesn't seem that way. Your physicians prioritize dozens of data points to conclude that bypass may be necessary. Unless it is an emergency, a 2nd opinion may help allay your anxiety. Read more...
Depends. There are too many variables, such as the severity of disease, presence of "target" vessels for bypass etc. to be able to answer this question in generic terms. This is a very individualized consideration that is best answered by your cardiologist or even primary care physician. Technically, it is possible to treat any heart disease without CABG, but non-surgical treatment may be sub-optimal. Read more...

Wht does ths mean Triple vessel coronary artery disease needs clinical corelation & furthr evaluation with conventional angiography? No heart atack yet

All areas affected. The three vessels are the right side, the left anterior descending which is in front, and the left circumflex which is in the back and left side. Three vessel disease so is just all three major areas of blood distribution are affected. Clinical correlation refers to injecting dye into the arteries directly taking pictures and actually seeing how much blockage there is in the arteries. Read more...
All 3 major heart. arteries have advanced atherosclerosis, likely heart attacks, just not large/recognized. Angio=shadows of openings of arteries & narrowings due to plaque ruptures & clots; Not actual artery walls & Ds. Ds begins in childhood; driven by lipoproteins, glucose above low nl & ?ed BP. Thus drive LDL-particles to 9 ?mol/L, HbA1c 5.0%, SBP . Read more...

If coronary artery disease cannot be identified by MRA, why did my cardiologist tell me it could be? And cancelled my angio because MRA was normal?

Complicated. Harrie, MRA is a good (but not perfect) test for detecting Coronary Artery Disease (CAD). It is an excellent screening test, especially in the young or those without major risk factors. Since CAD is very unlikely in a 23 year old, your cardiologist probably felt this was sufficient to rule it out, and an invasive procedure like a cath wasn't worth the risk to you. Hope this helps! Read more...
It can. At 24 years of age, your chances of having significant coronary artery disease are small, especially if there is no early heart disease in the family. MRA is non-invasive, and can identify coronary artery disease, though with limitations. Cardiac catheterization is invasive, and while it is a definitive study, it is not without risk of complications. Read more...
MR of coronaries. An MRI/MRA of the chest is usually to asses global anatomy and large vessels. Coronary vessels are too small to be accurately evaluated by MR, although this is an area of continuing research. Cardiac CT would be the best noninvasive imaging test to evaluate the coronary anatomy, although given your age, your risk is small without significant history or clinical findings. Read more...