Is respiratory failure a side effect of the medicines given for pulmonary fibrosis?

No. The drugs given for the most common type of pulmonary fibrosis, would include anti-inflammatory medicine and an immune suppressant called azathioprine. These drugs do not cause respiratory failure per se, although suppressing the immune system may increase the risk of pneumonia, which itself can cause respirator failure, especially in the setting of lung disease.
Don't know. There are so many causes of respiratory failure. I don't know the answer to your question. I would like to refer you to our healthtaps pulmonologist or a private one. My line of practice is limited in surgery and self-healing meditation to treat cancers and chronic illnesses as a secondary support of complementary medicine.

Related Questions

After multiple respiratory, cardiac, and other organ tests, pulmonary fibrosis was ruled out as cause for my sob. Reduction of propranolol usage has helped somewhat, but not completely. What next?

Why propanolol. If a reduction in propanolol helped is it necessary for you to be on propanolol at all? Discuss with your doctor other options and see if you can get off this medication completely. Read more...
Exercise. If cardiac and pulmonary reasons have been ruled out and beta blocker induced(propranolol)asthma ruled out, deconditioning could be the cause so gradual exercise should improve. Read more...
Reduce completely? So you've had a thorough investigation, all of which has been negative so far. Reducing your propanolol has helped but not completely. I'd venture to ask why not stop it completely then and replace w/another blood pressure medication. Surely there are others you can take that won't affect your breathing! if you need a rate limiting agent, consider Diltiazem or verapamil, which won't affect lungs. Read more...
Have they. Done a methacholine challenge test? You might have a form of asthma. That would make since as propanalol would make asthma worse. Read more...

Does bad air affect respiratory function in people with diseases like asthma or pulmonary fibrosis?

Yes. Pollution, dust, high pollen levels during allergy season can greatly affect and exacerbate diseases like asthma (from my experience in kids) and i would think that the same could be said for other pulmonary diseases like pulmonary fibrosis. Read more...
Yes. People with chronic respiratory diseases should avoid heavily polluted air. Air quality alerts are issued for areas when there is a high concentration of pollution. These are usually reported on the local weather reports. In some instances, poor air quality can even cause chronic lung disease. For more information on this, go to the american lung association website. Read more...