Related Questions

Newborn jaundice day 10 bilirubin total 11.31mg/dl & bilirubin direct 0.43mg/dl day 20 bilirubin total 5.6 & bilirubin direct 1.0 should I b worried?

Should be fine. The only thing that i would recommend keeping an eye on is the direct bilirubin of 1.0 at 20 days of life. While not problematic at this point, it should be followed up on. Read more...
More testing needed. Probably nothing however the direct component of the bilirubin is rising. It sounds like your pediatrician is following this. But if baby is healthy likely ok. Premature infants should be followed more closely? Read more...

Do you know a treatment for newborn jaundice?

Light and feeding. Physiologic newborn jaundice is caused by rising bilirubin, a by-product the breakdown of excess hemoglobin. Bright light will cause further breakdown of this in a product that the kidney will excrete. Frequent feeding will cause bilirubin to pass through the intestines and liver exiting the body through bowel movements. Read more...
Jaundice . The treatment for jaundice is phototherapy. That is usually done in the hospital, or home phototherapy. If your child is jaundiced, have your doctor check the level. Very high levels of bilirubin can cause brain damage. . Read more...

I have a hh agency (new), peds & just had first time request for light therapy for newborn jaundice infant. What complications are there?

See below. Blue light therapy for jaundice is standard for breaking down the bilirubin that is being produced and seen in the skin and sclera. As long as the child's eyes are protected and hydration is monitored along with the bilirubin levels (by a health care professional), i fore see no complications as long as the bilirubin level is lowering and the child is not sick as well. Read more...
Light therapy . If the baby has cholestatic jaundice there is risk of "bronze baby" syndrome (they turn a dark gray color). If the baby has congenital erythropoietic porphyria they can develop blisters. (ask family history). Otherwise unless the family doesn't feed or change the baby while under lights the bigger risk is of not treating the jaundice. Read more...

Can newborn jaundice cause longterm medical problems?

Possibly. Mild jaundice is very common in newborns, especially breast-fed babies. Jaundice is caused by bilirubin, a breakdown product of hemoglobin. If the bilirubin level gets too high, it can lead to kernicterus, a rare neurological condition that can lead to permanent brain damage. Most hospitals monitor the bilirubin level in newborns in the nursery. Read more...
Rarely. Most jaundice is a passing variation of normal metabolic change.Many hospitals use passive methods to monitor the condition and test blood if there appears to be a problem.If a problem is recognized and treated in its early stages any problem is treatable with good long term outcome. If overlooked, the results can produce long term impairment. Read more...

What is the definition or description of: Newborn jaundice?

Newborn jaundice is. a yellow color of the skin and sometimes whites of the eyes,that occurs because of the immaturity of the liver,which allows bilirubin to build up.It can be made worse by the mom's and baby's blood types being different,or by not drinking/urinating/stooling enough.It generally causes no other problems and is sometimes treated with special light(phototherapy),so that is does not cause brain damage. Read more...

What is newborn jaundice?

Excessive bilirubin . Jaundice occurs when a substance called bilirubin accumulates in the baby's body that may cause a yellowing of the eyes & skin. It is a product of broken down red blood cells that usually cleared by the liver, kidneys & intestines. As the newborn's organs are not fully mature at birth, sometimes more bilirubin accumulates. If the level is too high, it may need to be treated using phototherapy. Read more...

Newborn jaundice bili 20 at its highest 1st wk of birth. All was taken care of and now a month later bili 12 still yellow tears, eyes. Is this normal?

Certainly not. This prolonged jaundice mandates explanation. One benign condition would be breast milk jaundice which can be extended up to 6 weeks. Biliary atresia, hemolytic conditions, metabolic diseases, e.g., hypothyroidism, are among the long list. Read more...
Yes. "jaundice" can hang around at low levels for about a month. As long as baby is gaining weight and eating well, we watch and wait. If it is getting worse or persists another 1-2 weeks then you need to have the baby seen. Usually we just wait and all resolves with no long term problems. Read more...
Workup needed. I would suggest that your baby have additional testing as part of the workup. There are many conditions which may result in jaundice at age one month. Infections, hepatitis, liver/bile duct abnormalities present at birth, alpha one antitrypsin deficiency and CF are included. Discussing an imaging scan as well is suggested. In the meantime, keeping the baby well hydrated is important. Read more...

Is it possible that newborn jaundice cause longterm medical problems as they get older?

Possible but rare. Severe jaundice, especially unconjugated hyperbilirubinemia in newborns, can lead to brain damage known as kern icterus. Extreme premies, however, can do so even at much lower level. Read more...
Unlikely an issue. About 1/3 of newborns have neonatal jaundice to some degree, peaking around day 4 and gradually declining. Some have jaundice enough to require phototherapy (lights) and rarely some require transfusions. As long as they receive proper therapy if needed, there is rarely if ever any long term effect on the kid or adult. Read more...