What is joint hypermobility and is physiotherapy a good treatment option?

May help. Joint hypermobility or loose joints result from ligament laxity. Physical therapy can not truly strengthen ligaments but can help with muscle strength and proprioception and may therefore be beneficial.
Poorly understood dx. JHS is symptomatic hypermobility. Many individuals who have hypermobility never have pain or require any treatment. When hypermobility is found associated with pain, or a few other criteria (see Brighton criteria) it is termed JHS. It is presumed to be caused by a defect in collagen but rarely have collagen related genes been implicated (TNXB gene).

Related Questions

What is joint hypermobility and will getting physiotherapy effectively treat it?

Possibly. Joint hypermobility or laxity can be a normal variant in some individuals; however, it sometimes leads to pain in the hypermobile joint. This commonly affects the shoulder and is referred to as multi-directional instability. The first treatment for this is physical therapy to strengthen the muscles around the shoulder in order to stabilize the joint. Read more...
Poorly understood dx. JHS is symptomatic hypermobility. Many individuals who have hypermobility never have pain or require any treatment. When hypermobility is found associated with pain, or a few other criteria (see Brighton criteria) it is termed JHS. It is presumed to be caused by a defect in collagen but rarely have collagen related genes been implicated (TNXB gene). Read more...