If I am young, should the risks for pulmonary embolism be low?

And there's more.... Smoking, oral contraceptives and some other medications may also increase your predisposition for producing clots and pes.
Depends... No matter your age, you could develop pe. There are risk factors like long periods of immobility, trauma and congenital clotting defects that can be present so that even a younger person can have a pe. There are patients who have pe without any symptoms. If you think you might have a pe, you should be evaluated in an er since pe is potentially life-threatening.
Yes. However, not zero. I have had patients under thirty with pulmonary embolisms. Some patients are predisposed to clotting disorders. Also, one could develop an embolsim if one were in a motor vehicle accident. Long car rides and airplane flights even in young people can cause blood clots in the legs which could go to the lungs.
Relatively. The risk for a pulmonary embolism are greater in older patients. Pulmonary embolus ( pe) can be seen in young people who have other risk factors. These would include long periods of immobility ( such as after trauma), or disease like cancer. Other risks include obesity, sometimes with pregnancy or with birth control use, so pe can be observed in young people with risk factor.
If you have no other risk factors, the risk of pulmonary embolism (pe) generally goes up as you get older. However, many conditions can increase the risk of pe in younger people. These conditions include pregnancy, cancer, long periods of immobility, smoking, family history, extra estrogen from birth control pills, surgery, overweight, .

Related Questions

Unprovoked pulmonary embolism. Small low burden. Been on thinners for 4 months absolutely NO risk factors. Should I come off?

It depends. A pulmonary embolus triggered by surgery or a mild risk factor such as estrogen therapy, long-distance travel, non-surgical hospital stay may be treated for 3 months, rather than 6 or 12 months. A pulmonary embolus that was unprovoked is treated for 6 to 12 months or long-term. You should consult with your doctor for a specific recommendation. Good luck. David Fox, MD, FACS www.foxvein.com. Read more...

Is it really uncommon to have a pulmonary embolism when you are young?

Usually yes. In general pulmonary embolisms (like most illnesses) are less common in younger people. Having said that some underlying illnesses (including having autoimmune disease, clotting factor mutations, sickle cell disease etc.) increase risk - so do smoking, hormones, infections and cancer. Read more...
Depends. Depends on what you define as young. There are well-known risk factors for pulmonary embolism which include immobilization that can occur at any age; smoking, birth-control pills, genetic predisposition, autoimmune diseases such as lupus, and cancer, to name a few. Read more...

Can a low heart cause pulmonary embolism?

No. I'm guessing that you mean a heart that lays low in the chest. This would not cause pulmonary embolism; in fact the position of the heart would have no effect on pulmonary embolism, which is caused by clots in veins (usually in the legs or pelvis) breaking loose and traveling to the lung. Read more...
Possibly. Low cardiac output can lead to stasis of blood either in the heart or in the veins. This can lead to clots, which can travel to the lungs, causing pulmonary emboli. Read more...

How can pulmonary embolism kill when active, no family traits, no drugs, smoking are young?

Clotting tendency. Clotting tendencies can occur in 8% of the population age 25 or older with increasing tendency with each decade. If a large enough clot forms in the veins of the legs and breaks off it can block the blood flow through the heart and pulmonary artery. Sudden death can be the consequence. It is all too frequently seen in clinical practice. Even minor trauma to the legs or immobility can cause this. Read more...
Trauma, immmobility. Risk factors for deep venous thrombosis, which is usually the cause of a pe, include trauma to the vessel (which promotes clotting) and immobility (often related to pain from the trauma). Read more...
OC. Oral contraceptives increase the risk of pulmonary embolism slightly. Also trauma and immobility (for example, being in bed for a prolonged period or a long airplane ride). Read more...
Extent of disease. Death from pulmonary embolism is related to the degree and extent of the clots in the lung . If greater than 50% of the pulmonary arteries are acutely occluded by blood clots the risk for death dramatically rises. Contributing factors also include delay in establishing the diagnosis. Read more...

After having a pulmonary embolism, is being short of breath normal when your INR is low?

Not really. You may be short of breath after pulmonary embolism (pe) due to residual clot in the pulmonary arteries if you get recurrent episodes of shortness of breath you may be having recurrent pe. This may occur especially if your inr is not maintained in the therapeutic range. This is not normal and requires further evaluation. Tell your physician! Read more...
Abnormal. But common due to, lung damage or heart impact inr is a test of anticoagulant - Coumadin (warfarin) and not specific to any breathing issue. Read more...

After having a pulmonary embolism, is it normal to be short of breath if your INR is low?

No. The concern would be that 1) shortness of breath is a common symptom of a pulmonary embolism and 2) a low inr means that the blood is not thin enough to protect against the formation of pulmonary embolisms so 3) the symptoms of shortness of breath might be a recurrence of a pulmonary embolus. Read more...
Depends. If you have had a large pe, it is normal to be short of breath for a few weeks or months as you recover, no matter what your INR is. If you have been ok with a therapeutic INR but now you are short of breath with a low inr, have yourself checked, or get some Lovenox or Arixtra shots while you are adjusting your Coumadin (warfarin) to a desired inr. Read more...
No. A low inr is dangerous if you have pulmonary emboli. You can develop new pe on top of the old pe's. So, i would try to keep the inr at a therapeutic level. Read more...