Why might someone with aortic stenosis be prescribed phosphodiesterase inhibitors?

Post operatively. People are reluctant to give pre op patients with critical aortic stenosis inotropes. They stimulate the heart, but in the case of dobutamine and milrinone (most common phosphodiesterase inhibitor) they also drop the aortic pressure past the valve, and that can be very bad. Post op, PDE's can be preferable to other inotropes because sympathomimetics worsen the stiffness of the thick LV.

Related Questions

Any advice? What tests are used to detect aortic stenosis, and when are they prescribed?

Echocardiogram. Aortic stenosis can be accurately diagnosed and the severity determined with a reasonable amount of accuracy by echocardiography. The most typical reason to order an echocardiogram, looking for aortic stenosis, would be detection of an abnormal sounding heart murmur. Read more...
Echocardiogram. The easiest test is an echocardiogram, which is non- invasive and simple to repeat. It is recommended when a murmur is heard during a routine physical examination. Read more...

Surgery for someone with aortic stenosis?

Sometimes. There is surgery for this but is only indicated for a when stenosis becomes bad and your overall condition matters too. Consult your doctor for a surgeons opinion. Read more...

What is the typical lifespan of someone with aortic stenosis?

Depends. It is not just the presence of aortic stenosis, but the arrival of symptoms that determine whether the condition needs to be treated aggressively. With the development of chest pain, shortness of breath, and syncope, or fainting, the need for surgery increases. Otherwise, medical therapy may be all that is necessary for a long life. Read more...

What would be the average lifespan of someone with aortic stenosis?

Depends. Slight stenosis and minimal pressure gradient can be tolerated for a long time. Example congenital bicuspid valve patients can be aged. Once symptomatic aortic stenosis with syncope, angina, heart failure, the historic data suggest less than a year survival. That's why these patients are identified by murmur, echo and treated surgically. Read more...
Vague question. You need t know the gradient across the stenosis. High gradients require valve replacement, as the left ventricle will begin to enlarge (hypertrophy) which can eventually lead to heart failure. Echocardiography and/or left ventricular angiography performed by an interventional cardiologist can define the gradient, then you both can decide on best treatment options. Read more...

Why would someone with aortic stenosis be at risk for sudden death?

Fixed cardiac output. With aorttic stenosis the amount of blood pumped by the heart is fixed below a specific threshold as it cannot increase the output even with increased demand as with exercise etc. Consequently, the heart , the brain or any other organ will not get the increased blood supply it needs and therefore sudden death from irregular heart beats, myocardial infarction or syncope and brain ischemia can kill. Read more...

What is the average lifespan of someone with aortic stenosis if not corrected?

Depends on symptoms. Patients with uncorrected aortic stenosis have a poor survival: half of the patients that develop angina (chest pain) will die within 5 years, half of the patients that develop syncope (passing out) will die within 3 years, and half of the patients that develop heart failure will die within 2 years. Aortic valve replacement can pretty much normalize the life span and improve symptoms markedly. Read more...