Which term is more commonly used: "hay fever" or "pollen allergy"?

Pollen allergy. The old term "hay fever" is antiquated and not very descriptive as it usually is only sometimes related to hay and there is no fever. Therefore the more modern terms are seasonal or perennial allergic rhinitis---meaning allergic inflammation of the nose. Pollen allergy would be a seasonal allergy triggered by pollen.

Related Questions

Which term is more commonly used (hay fever or pollen allergy) to describe an allergic inflammation of the nasal airways?

Hay Fever. Hay Fever seems to be the most common way to describe nasal allergies by the general population. The proper medical terms include allergic rhinitis, non-allergic rhinitis, or mixed rhinitis depending on trigger. Read more...

Is it possible to cure allergies caused by pollen, dust, hay fever, etc. Without getting an allergy shot every two weeks?

No. You can help reduce your symptoms with avoidance and medications although allergy shots are really the only treatment option that can provide long term benefit even after stopping. Read more...

I want to try Ragwitek for Hay fever as opposed to allergy shots. The problem is that I am allergic to all pollens & dust. Would it help?

Maybe. Rawitek is an extract of ragweed does have potential side effects and can interact with other drugs. Best talk to anallergist. Read more...
Yes and no. Ragwitek is an effective treatment for non severe asthmatics or others but this would only treat ragweed allergies. If this is your worst season then it is an effective treatment for those months but must be started 3 months prior. You would not be treating dust mite or other allergies you have though. If you have symptoms all year, allergy shots are more beneficial for you. Read more...

What is the best allergy medication for seasonal allergies like pollen, dust, ragweed, hay fever, dogs, cats, hamsters etc?

Various meds. There are various medications for rlief of allergy symptoms. These medications include antihistamines both over the counter and prescription, prescription nasal sprays and in some instances allergy injections. Read more...
There are a few. Not one medicine is better than another....Everyone's system is different...Some people get better with allegra..Others with zyrtec..Others with Claritin or even benadryl (diphenhydramine). These are now over-the-counter...Try some and read the labels. If you don't feel better, see a board certified allergist (www.Acaai.Org). Good luck. Read more...