What kind of doctor can operate on varicose veins?

Vein doctors. Veins are treated by many kinds of physicians but physicians who dedicate their practice to the treatment of veins are usually certified by the American Board of Venous and Lymphatic Medicine and are called phlebologists. This is a board certification in vein treatment. Other physicians also treat veins including vascular surgeons, general surgeons, dermatologists and plastic surgeons.
Vascular Surgeons. Vascular surgeons are board-certifed doctors who spend 7 years in residency & fellowship to learn vein operations. They are true "vein specialists" who dedicate their careers to treating blood vessel diseases. They have hospital operating room priveleges & are considered the most highly trained. Other physicians may do vein procedures, but are not board-certified vein surgeons per the ABMS.
Phlebologist. Phlebologist are vein specialists. Many were trained as vascular surgeons, some were trained as interventional radiologist or dermatologists.

Related Questions

What kind of a doctor do I need to remove varicose veins wrapped around the tibal nerve in the tarsal tunnel?

Varicose. veins can be surgically remediated. My first approach would be arch supports for the tarsal tunnel syndrome. This can take the traction off the nerve in many cases. Read more...
Vein Specialist. For vein related problems you should see a vein specialist. The American Board of Venous and Lymphatic Medicine certifies physicians in the treatment of venous disorders. If you go to its website you can find a vein specialist near you. Read more...

What other type of doctor treat varicose veins since I cannot locate interventional radiologist or vascular surgeon on my PPO plan. Advice?

Wear support hose. The reason to treat varicose veins is to prevent post phlebitis syndrome and painful enlargement of veins of leg. The veins are usually removed by stripping or injections to clot the veins and are performed by a vascular surgeon or interventional radiologist. The alternative is to wear compression socks when walking which collapse the veins and accomplish almost as much as surgery. Read more...
Varicose veins. Varicose veins can be treated by a general surgeon or a vascular surgeon. Occasionally a plastic surgeon. Look for someone board certified in surgery, and/or someone with special training/board certification in vein surgery. There are many vein clinics today so it shouldn't be hard to find a specialist. Finding a doctor on your plan, that's a different problem. No easy answers to insurance today. Read more...
Cardiologist. Some cardiologists, plastic surgeons and family practitioners also treat varicose veins. Just make sure they have extensive training and not just some week long course. Read more...
Dont Base it on PPO. It is a bad idea to base your decision on who to see for a medical problem base on who is on your PPO plan. Recommend that you seek someone with the right level of education, training, & experience even if it means they are not in your PPO. The specialists that are board-certified in all from of varicose vein treatments (intervention, surgery, medical therapy) are vascular surgeons per ABMS.org. Read more...

Top doctors for varicose veins in little rock ar?

Vascular Surgeons. Seek a board-certified vascular surgeon in AR. Go to the website www.VascularWeb.org and click on the "Find a Specialist" link at the top of the page. This is the website for the Society for Vascular Surgery (SVS), which is composed of some of the top vein doctors in the country. SVS is a national organization for 4,500 of the most highly-trained and skilled vascular surgeons in the world. Read more...
Top vein doctors. There are 2 excellent websites to find top vein doctors. These are vein experts and vein directory. Both are .org and both will direct you to experts in your area. Read more...
Varicose veins. You may also check two websites American college of phlebology American venous forum These are two international vein societies with strong membership of doctors that treat varicose veins. Read more...

Can an X-ray taken of the leg show that there was a venous closure procedure (varicose veins) done 5 years ago? Is it important to tell a doctor this?

Sonogram not X-RAY. A venous ultrasound to look at the saphenous veins would show if the saphenous vein has been closed. 5 years since the closure the vein would be threadlike or non existent. If the vein appeared normal, then it either wasn't treated by closure or the closure was unsuccessful. Read more...
Usually not. Unless it was surgical procedure with metal clips used there will be nothing on x-ray to show venous ablation. The laser fibers and rfa technology used today do not leave anything radio plaque behind. You should give your doctor your full medical history as possible. Read more...
NO. X ray will not show where a venous closure procedure was performed in the leg. An ultrasound might. It is always a good idea to share your prior medical history and procedures with your physician. Read more...

Should my husband have a blood test done he has pain in his leg and it appears to be varicose veins. He went to a doctor and he prescribed a medicin.

Pain in leg. A pain in the leg and varicose veins is usually a superficial thrombophlebitis. This is treated with anti-inflammatories and compression. A concern would be for a deep venous thrombosis or a dvt, which is usually accompanied by leg swelling. The gold standard test for this is a venous duplex ultrasound but occasionally a blood test is done for screening. The blood test is not necessary. Read more...
Venous US is best. The best test to evaluate leg pain with veins is a venous doppler ultrasound [ us] test. It is important to look for superficial phlebitis and deep vein thrombosis {dvt} . A blood test is not necessary. It is ideal that for problem like this that your husband see a vein specialist as they can do the test in the office and make treatment decisions right away. Read more...

On my left leg where my varicose veins are, my leg has been aching & hurting so bad. I don't know what to do, rush to the doctor or what?

Varicose veins. If the symptoms are just aching and not swelling and posterior calf pain- i suspect but could not diagnose without seeing you that the problem is not deep vein thrombosis which is the worrisome phlebitis or blood clot. Sometimes the superficial veins or varicose veins become inflammed ie red, tender, and warm and are easily treated. Certainly the aching and the varicosities may not be related. Read more...
Maybe. Varicose veins are a result of venous insufficiency. Venous insufficiency can cause leg aches and hurting. They can also cause swelling, itching, burning and restless leg symptoms. If you have significant swelling and pain in your calf when you walk, this could be a sign of a deep vein thrombosis (clot) and this does require immediate attention (er - now). If not, see a phlebologist (vein doc). Read more...
Seek care. If any of your veins are hard, lumpy, warm, red, tender, and/or swollen, you could have phlebitis and you should see your doctor right away. Regardless, you should talk to your doctor about your varicose veins and see what can be done about taking care of your varicose veins. It sounds like a visit to a vein specialist would be a good idea. Read more...

In the hands of a competent physician, is clarivein more technically demanding than that of a radio frequency approach when treating varicose veins?

Same. A competent phlebologist should be able to preform clarivein procedure as well as radio frequency ablation procedure. Clarivein does not require tumescent (local) anesthesia; however, it is a newer method, and the long term results are still not in. Radiofrequency ablation has good results, and long term followup shows 90%+ success. Read more...
Clarivein. Not really. The technique is fairly straight forward and and not considered difficult, but like any procedure there is a learning curve so it is important to know how many procedures that the physician has performed. Although the preliminary results are good & it has acheived FDA approval, we do not have long-term outcome data like we do for thermal ablation i.e. EVLT or radiofrequency ablation. Read more...
ClariVein. ClariVein is technically easier. However, in thin patients, especially below the knees, it seems to leave hemosiderin staining along the course of the ablated saphenous vein and therefore, I use other technologies below the knee. The benefit of seeing someone who uses different technologies is that he/she could choose the most appropriate technology for the patient. Read more...
Closure procedures. There are many alternatives to closing a refluxing vein including Clarivein, Laser Ablation, RadioFrequency Ablation, Varithena and VenaSeal. Each method has its pros and cons and all methods work and the long term results are similar for each method. A physician trained in any or all of these methods should be able to perform them safely. Some are technically more difficult to do than others. Read more...
Clariven. These are 2 different approaches to management, the Clariven is both a mechanical, and chemical destruction of the vein, and does not require the use of tumescent anesthesia. The radiofrequency approach is a thermal ablation of the vein, and does require tumescent anesthesia. They are both reasonable options. Read more...