What is the difference between paranoid schizophrenia and paranoid personality disorder?

Reality. Schizophrenia means a loss of contact with reality. If you read or saw "A beautiful mind" that would be an excellent example of paranoid schizophrenia. A personality disorder does not have this disconnect.

Related Questions

What is the difference between paranoid personality disorder and delusional disorder?

Specific or general? Paranoid personality is pervasive suspiciousness, hostility, and distrust as a habitual response. The suspicions are unfounded but they are plausible. Delusional disorder is an irrational delusion about one specific thing (and it may be completely implausible, even psychotic). Outside of the one area of delusion, the person's thinking is otherwise normal. Read more...

How do you tell the difference between paranoid personality disorder or just my generalized anxiety disorder?

Cause of fear. The main difference between paranoid personality disorder and generalized anxiety disorder is in what causes the anxiety. In paranoid personality the main issue is a distrust and fear of people with worry that others are malevolent or want to harm one. In generalized anxiety, the fear is about many different issues such as the future, possible accidents, illness, etc. Read more...
True paranoia. Is very different from gad. Why not ask your psychiatrist to explain the difference? Read more...

What are the main differences between paranoid personality disorder and normal suspicion?

Paranoid. Is one of cluster a personality disorders, classified along with schizoid & schizotypal personality disorders. It is a pervasive global mistrust of others & preoccupation with hidden motives & suspiciousness, severe enough to interfere with daily functioning. Suspiciousness does not interfere with other activities or incapacitate the person. Read more...

Is paranoid personality disorder a true mental illness?

Yes, it is. Yes, paranoid personality disorder is a real mental illness. In it, there's a fixed, pervasive, and relatively inflexible pattern of distrust and suspiciousness such that others' motives are interpreted as malevolent. It generally begins in teen years or early adulthood, and differs markedly from one's culture. It causes distress in important areas of functioning, like relationships or work. Read more...

Can there be any long lasting treatment for paranoid personality disorder?

WEll... Possibly. Here is the problem, the individual with paranoia often does not remain in long -term therapy because their paranoia creeps into the patient - doctor relationship. Eroded trust often equates to exiting therapy. Read more...