11 doctors weighed in:

Are there any exercises the help with urinary incontinence?

11 doctors weighed in
Dr. Scott Kramer
Gynecology
4 doctors agree

In brief: Squeeze before Sneez

Some women find it difficult to locate their kegel muscles.
Think about what you do when in an elevator and you don't want to pass gas? That's right you keep your tummy muscles soft and tighten your bottom. Those muscles close your urethra so urine doesn't leak (and also your vaginal opening for improved sex). Practice a few times a day. So remember when you feel a cough or a sneeze... Squeeze.

In brief: Squeeze before Sneez

Some women find it difficult to locate their kegel muscles.
Think about what you do when in an elevator and you don't want to pass gas? That's right you keep your tummy muscles soft and tighten your bottom. Those muscles close your urethra so urine doesn't leak (and also your vaginal opening for improved sex). Practice a few times a day. So remember when you feel a cough or a sneeze... Squeeze.
Dr. Scott Kramer
Dr. Scott Kramer
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Dr. Michael Hulse
Gynecology
1 doctor agrees

In brief: Yes

Kegel exercises can be helpful if performed on a regular basis.
Basically just squeeze your pelvic muscles as if you are trying to hold in gas. Squeeze for about 3-5 seconds at a time. Repetitions of about 20 squeezes several times a day can be effective. If you need help with exercises consult with health care provider.

In brief: Yes

Kegel exercises can be helpful if performed on a regular basis.
Basically just squeeze your pelvic muscles as if you are trying to hold in gas. Squeeze for about 3-5 seconds at a time. Repetitions of about 20 squeezes several times a day can be effective. If you need help with exercises consult with health care provider.
Dr. Michael Hulse
Dr. Michael Hulse
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1 comment
Dr. Jerome Yaklic
For many women who have difficulty properly performing Kegals - physical therapy can be very effective at helping them learn the proper technique
Dr. Bryan Treacy
Gynecology
1 doctor agrees

In brief: Kegel's

The problem is, most women can't do an intense enough kegel exercise.
I've found that physical therapy, combined with neocontrol therapy works best with 75-80% improvement without surgery. Neocontrol was fda approved in 1999 & employs a magnet to passively improve muscle tone from the lower abdomen to thighs, including the pelvic floor muscles.

In brief: Kegel's

The problem is, most women can't do an intense enough kegel exercise.
I've found that physical therapy, combined with neocontrol therapy works best with 75-80% improvement without surgery. Neocontrol was fda approved in 1999 & employs a magnet to passively improve muscle tone from the lower abdomen to thighs, including the pelvic floor muscles.
Dr. Bryan Treacy
Dr. Bryan Treacy
Thank
Dr. Ankush Bansal
Internal Medicine
1 doctor agrees

In brief: Yes

Kegel exercises are the classic exercise for women with urinary incontinence.
Basically, while sitting in a chair, contract the muscles at the bottom of your pelvis back & forth as if trying to control your bladder & then release. Do this several times in a sitting, several times a day. This is a good 1st line therapy for stress, urge, or mixed incontinence but it doesn't always work.

In brief: Yes

Kegel exercises are the classic exercise for women with urinary incontinence.
Basically, while sitting in a chair, contract the muscles at the bottom of your pelvis back & forth as if trying to control your bladder & then release. Do this several times in a sitting, several times a day. This is a good 1st line therapy for stress, urge, or mixed incontinence but it doesn't always work.
Dr. Ankush Bansal
Dr. Ankush Bansal
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Dr. Michael Carson
Internal Medicine

In brief: Yes

As stated above, women can practice tightening the "hold it in" muscles for about 5 seconds.
Do this 3 times a day (it can be done at work). This will work for "stress incontinence", which is a common issue in women who have delivered vaginally (symptoms include losing urine if you cough/sneeze/laugh). For men, or people with other causes, this won't work and you should see your physician.

In brief: Yes

As stated above, women can practice tightening the "hold it in" muscles for about 5 seconds.
Do this 3 times a day (it can be done at work). This will work for "stress incontinence", which is a common issue in women who have delivered vaginally (symptoms include losing urine if you cough/sneeze/laugh). For men, or people with other causes, this won't work and you should see your physician.
Dr. Michael Carson
Dr. Michael Carson
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