Related Questions

What is acute leukemia?

It is a disease. Acute leukemia is a blood disorder where white cells are not formed normally. It has excellent treatment available now. Read more...

How is acute leukemia cured?

Multiple ways. Leukemia, like any other type of cancer, can be cured in a variable proportion of cases. In many other cases where complete cure is not possible, long-time remission can be achieved. This is usually accomplished by using a combination of medications (chemotherapy). Many times, after chemotherapy, a bone marrow transplant can provide the definitive cure. Read more...

Which is worse: chronic or acute leukemia?

Acute. Acute leukemia comes on suddenly, and without treatment can quickly turn fatal. The chronic leukemias begin slowly and it can be many years before it is even obvious that someone is ill. This difference in behaviour is why they are called "acute" or "chronic.". Read more...

Is it possible to have acute leukemia twice?

Well, yes... Sometimes the same leukemia can come back, sometimes you can have 2 different types of leukemia. Read more...

How do you discover someone has acute leukemia?

Common symptoms. Symptoms at presentation of an acute leukemia are typically related to infiltration of the bone marrow with cancerous cells. This can cause bone pain. Additionally, the marrow is where the blood cells are made. So anemia - fatigue, paleness; low platelets - easy bruising, bleeding, petechiael rash; and abnormal white cells - fever, infection; are all common symptoms. Read more...
See below... Leukemia can present with multiple signs and symptoms including but not limited to: bone pain, refusal to bear weight, gum bleeding, bleeding from other sites, pallor, lack of appetite, fever, night sweats, unexplained weight loss, easy bruising, fatigue, etc. If a concern for leukemia exists, consultation with the primary care physician or a hematologist is recommended, followed by bone marrow. Read more...

Help please? How is the pain in acute leukemia?

Hard to say... It is very difficult to give you a general description of pain in leukemia since it varies widely from patient to patient. Generally, for example, in the beginning (before treatment) there may be bone pain from infiltration of the bone marrow or abdominal pain from infiltration of spleen/liver. Once treatment is initiated, there may be some pain associated with that, too. Read more...

Why does the risk of acute leukemia increase with age?

Mutations accumulate. ... during our lifetime in bone marrow stem cells. Like all cancers, leukemia typically requires multiple unlucky mutations to occur in a single cell. With age the chance of a stem cell getting the right combination of mutations goes up exponentially. When we begin life, as a single cell embryo, we start off with a clean slate, free of somatic mutations. . Read more...