Do CT scans examine both the chest and head?

CT. CT (Computed tomography) can examine any anatomical part of the body. It does use ionizing radiation to acquire imaging so typically only the necessary part of the body in question is imaged. So a CT chest would be performed separately from a CT of the brain. Indications would depend on your symptoms and what your doc is looking for. Always discuss your concerns with your doc and radiologist.

Related Questions

I've had 6 CT scans in a year. Is this really dangerous for me? Should I be worried about getting cancer now? The CTa were: 1 head, 2 abdomen, 3 chest

Almost no risk of Ca. Please see: http://www.scientificamerican.com/article/how-much-ct-scans-increase-risk-cancer/ also: 1) Risk of induced Ca from 6 CTs is very, very low. 2) There may be cellular repair at doses as low as CT, limiting cancer induction. (We don't know how much). 3) Whatever the theoretical risk, there must be a good reason to do the CT in the first place. I would worry more about why so many CTs. Read more...

How many CT scans can I have in a 4-6 wk time span? I've had 2 chest, 2 head, 1 additional CT scan and abt to have 1 for renal artery and aorta w/cont

CT . That is a lot of scans and radiation. If your condition requires the studies so that the risk of radiation is outweighed by the benefit to having the ct info, that drives the decision. Talk to your doc. Read more...
Risk vs Benefit. Be careful, and make sure there is good medical necessity before more tests using ionizing radiation. Ct carries the highest dose. But, the risk of the current medical problem may easily outweigh the potential future risk. Almost all data is from nuclear incidents with much higher radiation in 1 large dose. It is difficult to calculate risk at lower levels used in ct over weeks/months. Read more...

In the last year had lots of mri, cat scan, xray ultrasounds of my chest & stomach & my head & knee how much of a risk do I have from getting cancer?

Minimal. First, MRI and ultrasound do not increase risk of cancer. These do not involve exposure to any radiation. CT imaging and to a lesser extent plain x-rays carry a very small risk, which might become significant to an individual if tests are repeated frequently over many years. It is estimated that a single CT of the abdomen might increase cancer risk by 0.05%. Read more...