3 doctors weighed in:
Is acetazolamide the normal treatment for a acute glaucoma attack?
3 doctors weighed in

Dr. Robert Chang
Ophthalmology
1 doctor agrees
In brief: Sometimes
Typically the goal is to relieve pupillary block during an acute glaucoma attack.
This can be done in various ways -- meds, lasers, eye pressure, etc. Depending on the view through the cornea, the eye pressure, the duration of attack, pain level, etc. Different or multiple methods may be combined. Acetazolamide is a medication oral or iv.

In brief: Sometimes
Typically the goal is to relieve pupillary block during an acute glaucoma attack.
This can be done in various ways -- meds, lasers, eye pressure, etc. Depending on the view through the cornea, the eye pressure, the duration of attack, pain level, etc. Different or multiple methods may be combined. Acetazolamide is a medication oral or iv.
Dr. Robert Chang
Dr. Robert Chang
Thank
Dr. Richard Bensinger
Ophthalmology
In brief: Part
An acute attack is when the pupil (iris) becomes fixed in mid position, the front of the eye shallows out and the fluid (aqueous humor) cannot exit causing elevation of the eye pressure to dangerous levels.
Treatment includes Pilocarpine to narrow the pupil, several topical agents to lower the pressure, acetazolamide to assist in this and eventually a laser pupil opening to prevent attacks.

In brief: Part
An acute attack is when the pupil (iris) becomes fixed in mid position, the front of the eye shallows out and the fluid (aqueous humor) cannot exit causing elevation of the eye pressure to dangerous levels.
Treatment includes Pilocarpine to narrow the pupil, several topical agents to lower the pressure, acetazolamide to assist in this and eventually a laser pupil opening to prevent attacks.
Dr. Richard Bensinger
Dr. Richard Bensinger
Thank
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