Describe retinal vein occlusion?

Eye vessel problem. Retinal vein which drains the blood out of the eye gets occluded. This causes blurryness of vision, sometimes loss of vision. It can come suddendly. Elevated blood pressure and patients with diabetes are some of the risk factors. New treatments are available to control some of the problems due to closure of blood vessels in the eye.
See a retina special. A central or branch retinal vein occlusion can lead to vision loss. Lack of normal perfusion in the retina can lead to bleeding, swelling, and neovascularization. Treatment can include an intravitreal injection of a medication (anti-vegf or steroid) or laser depending on the type of vein occlusion. Do not delay in seeing a retina specialist.
Eye vessel problem. Retinal vein occlusion is blockage of the blood vessels returning from the eye to the body. Common retinal vascular disorder. Clinically it presents with variable visual loss. Central retinal vein occlusion results in "100 day glaucoma".

Related Questions

What can I expect from a branch retinal vein occlusion?

Depends on severity. It depends on the severity and the perfusion of the retina. If a patient has macular edema ("swelling of the retina"), treatment is generally recommended. When it first presents, monthly monitoring with a retinal specialist is recommended. Read more...

Can you give me more info on a branch retinal vein occlusion?

BRVO or BVO. A type of blockage resulting from vascular disease (atherosclerosis, clot formation etc.) involving the veins of the retina. Mild to severe visual loss. Most frequent with hypertension, diabetes, clotting disorders. Swelling of the retina blurs vision. Prompt treatment and management of medical problems is critical. Many new treatments have improved prognosis. Read more...

What is the cure for retinal vein occlusion?

There is no cure. There are only treatments to treat the effects: intravitreal injections and/or laser for macular edema (swelling), laser for proliferative changes (new blood vessel growth), and vitrectomy surgery for vitreous hemorrhage. See a retina specialist. Read more...

Is a branch retinal vein occlusion could be a sign of MS?

Don't think so. Optic neuritis is typically associated with ms. Brvo is associated with hypertension, or certain blood clotting disorders, depending on your age. Read more...
No. Brvo is not typically associated with ms. You need to be evaluated for systemic hypertension, diabetes, clotting disorders, and other related eye/ systemic disorders to prevent recurrence and involvement of your other eye. You also need to see a retinal specialist to treat the brvo and minimize long term related deficits. Read more...
Not at all. You are describing a cause of an ischemic optic neuritis, which is very different from an inflammatory optic neuritis. MS is not a disease of blood vessels or circulation. Read more...

Please help! What is the incidence of bilateral central retinal vein occlusion?

Not common. Bilateral CRVO is not common. Bilateral CRVO has been associated with hyperviscosity syndromes such as primary and secondary polycythemia, leukemia/lymphoma, multiple myeloma, and other rare conditions. Other risk factors include oral contraceptive use, diuretics, hypercoagulable states, and vasculitis. Read more...

Does avastin (bevacizumab) for hemi retinal vein occlusion work well?

Yes. It work well for retinal edema of the macula caused by retinal vein occlusions (central, hemi, and branch). Speak to your retinal specialist about this. Read more...

Is Anti-VEGF effective for treating Central Retinal Vein Occlusion?

Anti-VEGF. Yes, anti-VEGF treatment is effective for CRVO. Many clinical trials have led to this conclusion. Outcomes vary and depend on type of CRVO (ischemic vs no ischemic) and starting visual acuity and other co-morbidities. . Read more...

Is there any more significant risk of doing cataract surgery on an eye that had a central retinal vein occlusion about a year ago vs a normal eye.

It depends . The technique used won't need to change. However various aspects of the central vein occlusion will influence peri operative risks and expected visual outcomes. Risk factors like hypertension or hyper coagulate state (easy clotting) will play a role and will need to be under good control. Severe central vein occlusion can be associated with a type of glaucoma. Ask your eye surgeon. Read more...
Yes. There are some schools of thought that believe that microvascular disease such as vein occlusions and diabetes have an increased risk of getting neovascular glaucoma. Also, cystoid macular edema can happen in these subgroup of patients. Read more...