Explain briefly about retinal artery occlusion?

See a retina special. A blocked retinal artery (usually from an embolus that traveled from somewhere else in the body like the carotid artery or the heart) can lead to vision loss. It could be a branch or the central retinal artery. There are no good treatment, but a systemic workup to look for the source is required (carotid ultrasound and echocardiogram). A rarer cause is giant cell arteritis.
Eye vessel blockage. If the central retinal artery gets occluded, painless loss of monocular vision is the usual presenting symptom and there is complete loss of vision in that eye even though the fovea is not affected. The entire retina (with the exception of the fovea) becomes pale and swollen and opaque. These ocular strokes are caused by embolism & represents an eye emergency.
Retina. This is a blocked blood vessel in the eye...Basically a small ischemic stroke.

Related Questions

Is central retinal artery occlusion correctible, and if so, then how much time do you have?

Not Correctible. A central retinal artery occlusion is not correctable. While the vision lost is usually permanent, some improvement may occur with time. Be on the lookout for signs of neovascularization. This can cause a very painful type of glaucoma. While the vision is not correctable, things can get worse....See your eye doctor. Read more...
Not correctable . Occlusion of the vessel can occur from a plaque, clot, emboli, irregular heart beat, etc. Eye can worsen (glaucoma/pain) even if vision improves some, which is rare. The important task to do is to prevent more events in eyes and brain, see your family doctor to determine what caused this occlusion. Read more...
No good treatments. There are no scientifically proven treatments. If you have one though, you must be worked up for embolic disease (carotid ultrasound and echocardiogram) and you must rule out giant cell arteritis. Read more...