5 doctors weighed in:

Which are the stages that are induced in diabetic retinopathy?

5 doctors weighed in
Dr. Richard Bensinger
Ophthalmology
2 doctors agree

In brief: Many

Poorly controlled diabetics (and a few even with good control) can develop weakness of the blood vessels in the retina cause edema (fluid lead), vessel dilation, vessel leakage, hemorrhage into the center of the eye and in advanced stages scar tissue, vision loss and retinal detachment.
Each case is individual and the earlier you see an ophthalmologist, the more likely to preserve vision.

In brief: Many

Poorly controlled diabetics (and a few even with good control) can develop weakness of the blood vessels in the retina cause edema (fluid lead), vessel dilation, vessel leakage, hemorrhage into the center of the eye and in advanced stages scar tissue, vision loss and retinal detachment.
Each case is individual and the earlier you see an ophthalmologist, the more likely to preserve vision.
Dr. Richard Bensinger
Dr. Richard Bensinger
Thank
Dr. Richard Scartozzi
Ophthalmology - Retinal Surgery
1 doctor agrees

In brief: See a retina special

Diabetes damages blood vessels in the retina causing bleeding and swelling (diabetic macular edema - dme): nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy.
This is the most common kind and the kind that causes the most vision loss (from dme). When new abnormal blood vessels grow along the retina (proliferative), this can cause bleeding (vitreous hemorrhage), traction (retinal detachment), and/or glaucoma.

In brief: See a retina special

Diabetes damages blood vessels in the retina causing bleeding and swelling (diabetic macular edema - dme): nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy.
This is the most common kind and the kind that causes the most vision loss (from dme). When new abnormal blood vessels grow along the retina (proliferative), this can cause bleeding (vitreous hemorrhage), traction (retinal detachment), and/or glaucoma.
Dr. Richard Scartozzi
Dr. Richard Scartozzi
Thank
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