What is a VBAC?

VBAC. Vaginal birth after cesarean section. Some women want to have a repeat c-section and other women want to try to have a vaginal delivery. Whether or not this is a good idea depends on what type of incision was used on the first surgery, why you had the first surgery and the ability of a facility to handle any possible complications that could result from a vbac.
Risky choice. Vbac is what you get if your gamble pays off - and you avoid a second cesarean section. Keep in mind that this gamble risks a ~10-fod higher risk of fetal/neonatal death compared to a scheduled prelabor second c-section and may only be justified if you plan to have many more pregnancies and do not wish the risks of multiple c-sections.
VBAC. Vaginal birth after c-section. There are pros & cons with vbacs that are addressed in other healthtap topics.

Related Questions

What are complications of vbac?

Uterine Rupture. The most common complications are a failed vbac & need for vaginal bypass (c-section). The most serious are uterine dehiscence (separation of the uterine scar) or rupture. This can lead to catastrophic results with hemorrhage, emergency surgery, hysterectomy, and fetal loss. Major point - please vbac in a hospital where your OB can keep you safe and have access to immediate surgery if needed. Read more...
Uterine rupture. Failed vbac with repeat c-section is most common problem. Uterine rupture in the area of the previous incision is the most serious. This occurs in less than 1% of pt. But is very dangerous to mother and baby if it happens. Results may include severe bleeding, hysterectomy, fetal death and maternal death. Read more...

What's the percentile of succesful vbac after 2 csections. Last csection 2/25/09 I'm due Jan 30th?

Individualized care. The chances of success are going to depend on the size of the baby, the shape of your pelvis and the strength of your labor contractions. Individualized counseling will be needed between you and your doctor to assess your chances of success and also to discuss the risks associated with VBAC. Although some will many doctors are not willing to take on the risks of a VBAC after 2 c sections. Read more...
VBAC. I don't recommend you consider a VBAC after two c sections. Your risk of uterine rupture, which is now much higher than VBAC after one c section. Your success for VBAC in general is however dependent upon why your first c section was done for. You need to discuss this with your OB, who may not even do VBACs. Read more...

What are risks of having a VBAC?

Uterine Rupture. The most worrisome risk of a VBAC is rupture of the uterine scar. If you have a low-transverse uterine scar, the risk of this is low, around 1% (1 in 100). However if it happens to you, it can be very dangerous for your baby. Another risk is problems in labor that lead to a c/section anyway. This happens to 20%-40% of VBACs. Infections are higher in women who had a c/section after labor. . Read more...

What can you tell me about VBAC and RCS?

VBAC vs RCS. A VBAC is a possible way to avoid another c/section. It isn't always successful and carries a small risk of catastrophic uterine rupture. VBACs are less successful in women who haven't had a prior vaginal birth, especially if the c/section was done for "failure to progress," or "arrest of dilation". A repeat c/section is a way to avoid the risks uterine rupture and unsuccessful labor. Read more...

What are the consequences of trying vbac?

Risky proposition. Vbac (vaginal birth after cesarean section) sounds like a worthwhile goal, but given the risks associated with it (uterine rupture, maternal-fetal hemorrhage/death) only consider it with one prior kerr c-section, normal weight for height, prompt access to a large maternity hospital, and desire for at least 1 more pregnancy after this current one. Fetal death/injury is ~10 times increased in tolac. Read more...

What are the risks associated with vbacs?

Uterine rupture. There is a small but extremely serious risk of uterine rupture (the incision on the uterus opening). This is why it is recommended that women vbac in hospitals where there is 24 hour a day in-house capablities to perform an emergency c-section rapidly. Read more...
Failed attempt. The major risk with any attempt to vbac (tolac) is failure - this is the 30-40% of cases that require repeat c-section and risk uterine rupture (15% risk) with potentially lethal consequences for the fetus/neonate (and/or the mother). Consider how many more pregnancies you foresee/desire for your family and go with repeat c-section and btl if this is your last pregnancy. Only try at large hospital. Read more...