7 doctors weighed in:

Is it better to take lots of little naps or to try to stay up to get on new time zone when travelling far?

7 doctors weighed in
Dr. Dennis Clifford
Internal Medicine - Pulmonary Critical Care
3 doctors agree

In brief: No data

No clear answer to your question.
My guess is staying up and not napping is more likely to get you back on track quicker, but if necessary a nap probably won't hurt.

In brief: No data

No clear answer to your question.
My guess is staying up and not napping is more likely to get you back on track quicker, but if necessary a nap probably won't hurt.
Dr. Dennis Clifford
Dr. Dennis Clifford
Thank
Dr. Sarah Kohl
Travel Medicine
2 doctors agree

In brief: Stay up

Jet lag is a mismatch between your internal clock and the external world if possible begin to shift to the new time zone (or at least a few hours closer to new zone) prior to leaving.
Once you depart immediately begin eating and sleeping according to new time zone. Once you arrive get out. Into the morning and afternoon sunlight and take melatonin at bedtime, these help to reset your clock.

In brief: Stay up

Jet lag is a mismatch between your internal clock and the external world if possible begin to shift to the new time zone (or at least a few hours closer to new zone) prior to leaving.
Once you depart immediately begin eating and sleeping according to new time zone. Once you arrive get out. Into the morning and afternoon sunlight and take melatonin at bedtime, these help to reset your clock.
Dr. Sarah Kohl
Dr. Sarah Kohl
Thank
1 comment
Dr. Steven Tucker
Also consider avoid alcohol on your flight, exercise after you land, and perhaps Vitamin D in the morning when you arrive. This is not evidence based but based on my experience as an "Expat" doctor in Asia, where we all travel far distances a lot.
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Dr. Shontae Buffington
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