What are possible non-invasive treatments for mitral stenosis with mitral valve area less than 0.85?

Mitral stenosis. Severe mitral stenosis is a mechanical obstructive lesion. It needs to be corrected by surgery or occassionally a catheter based dilation of the abnormal valve. Surgery is generally preferred. Non invasive treatment can not increase the valve area and is limited to slowing the heart rate to allow more time for ventricular filling. This is of limited benefit.

Related Questions

Is mitral stenosis a congenital defect or the narrowing of the mitral valve due to scaring?

Can be either. The majority of mitral stenosis is a result of a previous strep infection which cause rheumatic fever. This begins a slowly progressive scarring of heart valves. The aortic and mitral valves most commonly. However there can be congenital mitral stenosis when the mitral valve may not form big enough during fetal development. Read more...

How effective is an ultrasound (at ER) to rule out Mitral Valve Prolapse or Mitral Stenosis?

Ultrasound dx. An ultrasound examination is the test that is the most operator-dependent exam in medicine. It usually is not performed in the ER. MVP is usually a benign condition but mitral stenosis can be very serious. I would speak to a cardiologist about this. A good one can pick these conditions up by just listening with a stethoscope. Read more...
Not great. A formal echocardiogram with assessment by doppler is essential to make a diagnosis of mitral stenosis. ER ultrasounds are good for screening but not for a definitive diagnosis. . Read more...

My mother has mitral valve stenosis, orifice area 1 CM sq. LA size is 6.4 cm. She is on AF. What are her chances of survival without surgery for 5 yrs?

Need more info. This can only be answered by her cardiologist who knows her total medical history. There are a lot of variables including age, other illnesses and general health. Read more...

I may have mitral valve stenosis. Is that bad?

Depends. This depends on how severe the stenosis is. It is important to see a cardiologist and continue to watch this condition closely as it changes over time, and you may need surgery at some point in time. Read more...
It depends. Mitral stenosis is a disease of the mitral valve which doesn't let the valve open enough. It is more common in the us to see the valve leak. The issue is how blocked is the valve. If the mv is too tight then pressure builds up in the lungs and the lungs get sick with pulmonary hypertension. The usual treatment would be a valve replacement though some can be repaired. Read more...

How do I know if I have mitral valve stenosis. Please help!?

See your PMD. I don't know why you are specifically worried about mitral stenosis, however, if you have reason to suspect it such as history of rheumatic heart disease, then see your pmd who will check you for murmurs and, if any clinical suspicion, then will refer you to a cardiologist. Or if you can just see a cardiologist from the get go. Good luck. Read more...
Echocardiogram. People with mitral stenosis have a diastolic murmur (typically) and may have signs of left atrial hypertension (cough, shortness of breath, dyspnea on exertion.) the best test to reliably rule in or rule out mitral stenosis is an echocardiogram. Read more...

Can a mitral valve heart patient (mitral valve stenosis) be a mother?

Sure. Many are mothers. It may be advisable for you or not, but you'd expect to be followed by a cardiologist and maybe a maternal-fetal specialist. Read more...

What is mitral valve stenosis?

Narrowing. This is a narrowing of the valve opening usually caused by rheumatic fever. It eventually leads to respiratory symptoms and heart failure. Fortunately it can be successfully treated with surgery. Read more...
Mitral valve. The mitral valve has to open properly to let blood flow into the left ventricle from the atrium. If it doesn't, we call this stenosis. It has to close to keep the blood flowing toward the body, if it doesn't we call this regurgitation or insufficiency. Either or both problems can exist with the valve if its abnormal. Insufficiency is more common. Read more...

How do you diagnose mitral valve stenosis?

Stethoscope & echo. Mitral stenosis can be diagnosed by a characteristic murmur heard with a stethoscope. This can be confirmed by an echocardiogram (an ultrasound exam) which can help assess the severity of the narrowing of the valve. Read more...
Echocardiogram. If a physician hears a specific heart sound, he/ she can order an ultrasound of the heart (echocardiogram) which will look at the valves and can detect the mitral stenosis. Read more...

Is mitral valve stenosis dangerous or not?

Depends. This depends on how severe the stenosis is. It is important to see a cardiologist and continue to watch this condition closely as it changes over time, and you may need surgery at some point in time. Read more...