9 doctors weighed in:
What is the treatment for venous insufficiency?
9 doctors weighed in

Dr. Ted King
Phlebology
3 doctors agree
In brief: Close bad veins
When superficial veins are insufficient, they are structurally broken.
The vein walls are too stiff and don't have enough elastic in them. Vein valves that keep blood from flowing backwards are broken too. Nothing works right in these veins and we don't the technological ability to fix them yet. So we remove them. This can be done with surgery, sclerotherapy, and/or thermal ablation (laser/rf).

In brief: Close bad veins
When superficial veins are insufficient, they are structurally broken.
The vein walls are too stiff and don't have enough elastic in them. Vein valves that keep blood from flowing backwards are broken too. Nothing works right in these veins and we don't the technological ability to fix them yet. So we remove them. This can be done with surgery, sclerotherapy, and/or thermal ablation (laser/rf).
Dr. Ted King
Dr. Ted King
Thank
Dr. Scott Bolhack
Wound care
1 doctor agrees
In brief: Venous stasis
The treatment for venous stasis is compression.
Your clinician will order tests to confirm that your arterial supply is adequate for compression. Once that occurs, the management will differ but the end goal is the appropriate compression for your legs that is comfortable but adequate to compress. Compression stockings are made by many companies so find one that you are comfortable with.

In brief: Venous stasis
The treatment for venous stasis is compression.
Your clinician will order tests to confirm that your arterial supply is adequate for compression. Once that occurs, the management will differ but the end goal is the appropriate compression for your legs that is comfortable but adequate to compress. Compression stockings are made by many companies so find one that you are comfortable with.
Dr. Scott Bolhack
Dr. Scott Bolhack
Thank
1 doctor agrees
In brief: Well,
Superficial venous insufficiency is easily treatable by closing or removing the veins all meant to eliminate the reversed flow and lower the venous pressure.
With deep vein insufficiency corrective measures are not widely used. Compression, elastic/inelastic and elevation is the main form of treatment. If a perforator vein is found it could be closed by sclerotherapy.

In brief: Well,
Superficial venous insufficiency is easily treatable by closing or removing the veins all meant to eliminate the reversed flow and lower the venous pressure.
With deep vein insufficiency corrective measures are not widely used. Compression, elastic/inelastic and elevation is the main form of treatment. If a perforator vein is found it could be closed by sclerotherapy.
Dr. Gabriel Goren
Dr. Gabriel Goren
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Dr. Douglas Joyce
Phlebology
In brief: Ablation
Laser ablation of incompetent (leaking) veins reroutes the venous drainage into healthy veins.
This decreases the pressure in the skin veins back to normal and reverses the symptoms

In brief: Ablation
Laser ablation of incompetent (leaking) veins reroutes the venous drainage into healthy veins.
This decreases the pressure in the skin veins back to normal and reverses the symptoms
Dr. Douglas Joyce
Dr. Douglas Joyce
Thank
Dr. William Forsythe
Emergency Medicine
In brief: It varies
The most conservative approach is elevating legs when able, not crossing legs when sitting as it may constrict/restrict blood flow and wearing compression stockings.
This helps reduce the pressure that builds up and leads to venous insufficiency and possibly varicose veins or wounds on legs. Radio frequency or laser ablation often helps improve these veins and their symptoms, or microphlebectomy.

In brief: It varies
The most conservative approach is elevating legs when able, not crossing legs when sitting as it may constrict/restrict blood flow and wearing compression stockings.
This helps reduce the pressure that builds up and leads to venous insufficiency and possibly varicose veins or wounds on legs. Radio frequency or laser ablation often helps improve these veins and their symptoms, or microphlebectomy.
Dr. William Forsythe
Dr. William Forsythe
Thank
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