What is the treatment for hyperosmolar hyperglycemic state?

Insulin and fluids. Parentral adiminstration of Insulin is the key treatment. Such patients are dehydrated and have electrolyte imbalance, both of which are corrected with intravenous therapy.

Related Questions

What causes a hyperosmolar hyperglycemic state?

Many things. It can be caused by long periods of uncontrolled diabetes, some medications such as steroids, chronic illnesses such as alcoholism, acute illnesses such as infections strokes or heart attacks, severe stress. It can ocassionally be the first sign of a new diagnosis of diabetes. Most commonly it is the result of not paying attention to the diabetes. Read more...
Insulin presnt . Common denominator is excessive glucose in (soda), with progessive dehydration in a patient with diabetes who is sti capable of secreting pancreatic Insulin this aborting progressive ketoisis, but not enough to stop raisng bld.Glucose. Read more...

What is the definition or description of: hyperosmolar hyperglycemic state?

See answer details. Hyperosmolar hyperglycemic state is a complication of diabetes mellitus in which high blood glucose levels cause severe dehydration and an increase in serum osmolarity (relative concentration of solute); it is associated with a high risk of complications, including possible coma and death. It is related to diabetic ketoacidosis (dka), another complication of diabetes, but lacks the ketones of dka. Read more...
High Sugars . Super high blood sugars cause the osmolalrity of the blood to be increased. For example, pour a spooful of sugar into a cup of water and stir it up, then pour a cupful of sugar into that same cup of water. Notice how thick the water is getting? Now pour two more cups of sugar into that same up of water. That is hyperosmolar. This state of hyperosmolarity causes dehydration ultimately. Read more...

What are the differences between diabetic ketoacidosis and a hyperosmolar hyperglycemic state?

Insulin and acidosis. Hi. DKA is an insulin deficient state that contrary to lay bias, occurs in both type 1's AND type 2's. The nonketotic hyperosmolar, hyperglycemic state is a condition that occurs in type 2's; they have enough insulin to prevent ketoacidosis but not enough to prevent profound hyperglycemia and hyperosmolarity. It takes FAR LESS insulin to prevent ketoacidosis than it does to prevent hyperglycemia. Read more...