What is the treatment for esophageal atresia?

Put ends together. Esophageal atresia is a congenital anomaly where the esophagus (swallowing tube) is not open all the way into the stomach. For the baby to swallow, the 2 ends of the esophagus must be joined. Often there is also a tracheoesophageal fistula (tef), a connection between the esophagus and trachea (beathing tube) which must be repaired, too. The operation is done thru the chest, usually the right side.

Related Questions

What are the tests for esophageal atresia?

Esophageal atresia. Esophageal atresia is a congenital defect. Feeding the affected infant leads to choking, coughing and blue spells. Tests used to diagnose esophageal atresia include inability to pass a small feeding tube from the nose or mouth into the stomach. A plain x-ray of the esophagus may show air in the "pouch" of the atretic portion and coiled up feeding tube in that portion. Read more...

If someone has an esophageal atresia, are they likely to have some other problems with the GI tract?

Yes. A link of the esophagus to the trachesa is usually explored when esophgeal atresia is found. A failure of the anus to form to provide an outlet for stool is seen in a related syndrome that carries the vater lable. Drs will generally explore all related systems using xrays or other studies as part of their evaluation of this problem. Read more...
Yes. Esophageal atresia (ea) commonly occurs in association with other congenital anomalies, including the vacterl (vertebral/vascular, aortic/anorectal, cardiac, tracheo-esophageal, renal, and limb anomalies) association. Other atresias of the GI tract, such as duodenal and anal atresia occur. Aside from congenital anomalies, ea is commonly associated with ge reflux and esophageal dysmotility. Read more...
Possibly. If an infant has esophageal atresia, they will be evaluated for the vater association. This will rule out issues with imperforate anus and/or duodenal atresia. These are detected in the newborn period. Long term effects in later life are rare and are usually associated with the esophagus . Read more...

What are the early symptoms of esophageal atresia?

Early Symptoms. As a clinical neonatologist, the first symptom of esophageal atresia is the inability to pass an orogastric tube into the infant's stomach. I do this routinely in all newborn babies i examine in the delivery room. If the orogastric tube coils back and returns to the oral cavity, there is esophageal atresia. Determining if it is accompanied by a fistula with the trachea requires imaging studies. Read more...

What is the definition or description of: Esophageal atresia?

Esophageal atresia. Esophageal atresia (EA) is a congenital defect, which occurs before birth. There are several types. In most cases, the upper esophagus ends and does not connect with the lower esophagus and stomach. Most infants with EA may have another defect called tracheoesophageal fistula. Read more...

How long can you wait before having surgery for an esophageal atresia?

Hours/days not more. Esophageal atresia prevents a kid from receiving fluids & maintaining normal metabolic balance. While awaiting surgery, mouth secretions can build up in the remnant and transfer into the lungs causing pneumonia.Stabalization with IV fluids, suction & close monitoring is reasonable until the kid can be moved to a center where surgery can procede. Further delays deminish the chances for good outcome. Read more...
You cannot. If it is true atresia, that is the esophagus is not continuous then some surgery is warranted in the first few days of life. Depending on the type of atresia, the weight of the child and other associated conditions the options can include connecting the esophagus. Other times any abnormal connections to the trachea have to be separated. Read more...
Variable. Depends on the child's health and type of atresia. Healthy, term children undergo surgery in 1-2 days. Those that are premies or who have associated cardiac disease may have to wait (for weeks or months). While waiting, a tube is placed into the esophageal pouch to drain secretions. A g-tube can be placed to decompress the stomach & minimize risk of aspiration in patients with te fistula. Read more...

Does anything during pregnancy cause esophageal atresia?

No known cause. There is no known cause of esophageal atresia. It happens in about 1 out of 3000-4000 babies, which is 3 kids out of 10, 000 born. The esophagus (tube for food flow to stomach) and the trachea (tube for air flow to lungs) develop from the same part of an embryo. Because life is not perfect, once in a while the two tubes form an incorrect connection or a blind-ended tube. Read more...

If my boyfriend had an esophageal atresia what are the chances my child will too?

Depends. Roughly half of the esophageal atresia cases with or without te fistula (lung attachment) occur in isolation with polygenic influence.(little recurrence risk) the others occur with other defects in heart, kidney, bone or other areas. Genetic microarray studies have shown chromasomal micro-deletions in these more complex cases.(more recurrence risk) prenatal genetic counseling can define your risk. Read more...
Almost unheard of. Esophageal atresia is rare in itself. It's occurrence is sporadic and happens about 1:4500 live births. It can be picked up with prenatal ultrasound. Read more...