What is the treatment for cracked tooth syndrome?

Crown. Usually a crown would be recommended for cracked tooth syndrome. In some cases, you may need a root canal too if the crack has progressed close enough to irritate the nerve.
Varied. All teeth have superficial cracks! it is only when cracks deepen that they become symptomatic. Usually is starts w/ a sharp pain when chewing a bagel, nuts, popcorn, etc. Also the tooth may be sensitive to cold. As the crack deepens, chewing pain increases, cold sensitivity lingers, and heat sensitivity starts. In time all these symtoms increase and occur w/ less time intervals. Treatment ranges fr.
It Depends. Depending on the severity and location of the fracture, treatment options include a filling, a crown, sometimes root canal therapy or even extraction.

Related Questions

What is the definition or description of: cracked tooth syndrome?

Breaking tooth. Cracked tooth syndrome is the name for a condition where a tooth has a portion of it that is cracking and separating from the rest of it. The symptoms usually will be pain when chewing foods of a particular consistency and possibly, but not always, sensitivity to cold things. Read more...
Pain with biting. Cracked tooth syndrome is the name we give any tooth that hurts when you bit on it and regularly does this. It does have to be diagnosed to make sure no other reason is causing pain. Cts can be with a tooth that has a large filling, small filling and even no filling. Know that when it hurts to bite down or eat on that tooth you may be the proud owner of a tooth that will only get worse. Read more...
Pain when chewing. If your tooth gives you intense pain when chewing, you may have a cracked tooth. Cracks or fractures in teeth will show on x-rays, but not always. An experienced dentist can diagnose this without x-rays. If your dentist is not sure, an endodontist and/or oral surgeon can aid in the diagnosis. Read more...
CT Syndrome. Cracked tooth syndrome refers to a situation where the patient complains of intermittent pain on biting or chewing although there is no obvious clinical or radiographic indications as to cause. It is a diagnosis based merely on those symptoms. Occasionally there is pain on releasing the biting pressure rather than on biting down which tends to substantiate the diagnosis. Read more...
Incomplete crack. Cracked tooth syndrome is caused by a partial crack in a tooth under a cusp. It is mostly associated with amalgam metal fillings. The textbook symptom is pain on biting.The worst pain on release. As the cusp flexes the crack opens up and is filled in with fluid form the tooth. When the pressure is released the crack slams shut and the pressure of the fluid being forced out of the crack = pain. Read more...

Once you have cracked tooth syndrome, are you going to inevitably get more cracks? I've been told I have cracked tooth syndrome and several small cracks in one of my molars. I'm not sure what causes it, but I'm worried that once it's started I will just w

Cracked . Cracked tooth syndrome is a situation where there is a crack in the tooth, the tooth can hurt when you bite on it or when there is a thermal stimulus, but your dentist can't really pinpoint a problem. Usually when a patient has pain on a tooth, we attribute it to a specific factor like a cavity, a broken filling, a dead nerve, etc. We address that specific cause. When we cannot determine the actual cause, we sometimes attribute it to a crack. The crack can be caused by grinding, wear and tear, or just that one time that you bite the wrong way at the wrong time. For that one molar you asked about, it depends on how deep the cracks go and what direction they take. Cracks that stop above the gumline can be treated whereas cracks that go below the gumline often require extraction of the tooth. Difficult to advise you on what exactly your situation is. How did your dentist propose to treat your tooth? You did not say. Just leaving it will allow the crack to get worse. If there are multiple cracks, then you may need a crown on it. Regarding the rest of your teeth, if you are a bruxer, then an occlusal guard that snaps over your teeth will help, as well as an analysis of your bite. Smoothing down sharp points will take away those cusps that may be causing the problem. Hope this info helps. Read more...
Cracked . Cracked tooth syndrome (cts) involves a crack in the tooth portion that is above the gum line. 90 % of cts is fixed with a simple crown. It keeps the cracked part of the tooth above the gum line from moving & all the symptoms from being stimulating. The other 10% need root canal as well because the crack has reached the root canal system. If the crack is one of the above (described as favorable) this is a complete cure. If the tooth is cracked further below the gum, involving a fracture (or crack) of the root, the tooth will need to be extracted. Your dentist will know because there will be a space in the attachment of the tooth to the bone, just in the location of the crack. Xray evidences this type of crack, whereas cts is not discernable on xray exam. Read more...
Having . Having a cracked tooth is a problem, it hurts, and it can get worse. Teeth can crack because of the pressure of the bite, from biting down with force on a hard object or by having a filling that undermines the integrity of the structure of the tooth or expands and contracts so that it puts excessive force on the remaining structure and causes it to fracture. Which ever it is you got it. If the fracture is through the enamel and dentine but not through the pulp, the fracture system can be cut out and the tooth restored with an onlay or crown and you might be free from further complications. If that crack goes into the nerve, you will need root canal therapy and a post and crown. If the crack goes down the root of the tooth you are best advised to remove the tootha nd replace it with an implant or bridge ( i prefer the implant option) you should have your dentist carefully evaluate the way your teeth come together and see whether or not there is a clenching or interference that predisposes you toi putting excessive force on your teeth. Dr neil mcleod dds dentistry that lasts - quality that counts. Read more...

Difference between crack in tooth or cracked tooth syndrome?

Not much. Many teeth have cracks as you get older. Enamel is brittle and as you clench, grind, bite it causes some microfractures which eventually lead to cracks. Cracks are not a big deal until they become deep, deep enough to reach the pulp of the tooth. Once that happens their is intense pain on biting; the tooth most often needs a root canal or extraction to solve this problem. A crown is normally rec. Read more...
Discomfort. Teeth with cracks generally do not hurt. Teeth with cracked tooth syndrome generally hurt when biting. This makes it important to treat cracked teeth before they begin to hurt, or before they actually fracture. Read more...

Cracked tooth syndrome? At my last visit to the dentist, she told me I have cracked tooth syndrome and have tiny cracks in several of my teeth. I go back in 10 days for this, and i'd like to know what caused it, or if there's anything I can do to stop it.

Typically . Typically cracked tooth syndrome is due to bruxism (grinding teeth) or chewing excessively hard foods (such as ice). Control of these etiologies will go a long way to reducing the potential for cracked teeth. Read more...
An . An important point is... Do you have symptoms or not. Many teeth look like there are tiny cracks in them but with out the symptoms, this is not exactly cracked tooth syndrome. Just because your dentist showed you tiny cracks doesn't mean anything; in fact when we make a cap in porcelain & other neighboring teeth have tiny cracks (craze lines ) we try to duplicate them in the porcelain to make it look more realistic. So do you have cold sensitivity that does not linger? Do you have a sharp pain when you chew certain foods on one particular area of your mouth? To truely have cracked tooth your dentist can demonstrate this with a crackfinder tool (a type of bite stick ). We don't treat teeth unless we can demonstrate this. The solution for those ( that can't be demonstrated ) would then be relieving the occlusion & waiting for more symptoms or for the tooth to recover. Cracked tooth syndrome (cts) involves a crack in the tooth portion that is above the gum line. 90 % of cts is fixed with a simple crown. It keeps the cracked part of the tooth above the gum line from moving & all the symptoms from being stimulating. The other 10% need root canal as well because the crack has reached the root canal system. If the crack is one of the above (described as favorable) this is a complete cure. If the tooth is cracked further below the gum, involving a fracture (or crack) of the root, the tooth will need to be extracted. Your dentist will know because there will be a space in the attachment of the tooth to the bone, just in the location of the crack. Xray evidences this type of crack, whereas cts is not discernable on xray exam. Read more...
Amalgam fillings. Most likely it is the metal amalgam filling in your tooth. Metal mercury fillings are not compatible with tooth structure. Different physics and mechanics. In fact, healthy tooth structure has to be undermined to hold the amalgam filling in place. This weakens teeth. These fillings act like wedges in teeth and cause cracks and fractures. Read more...
Some clarification. This comes from weakened tooth structure & excessive biting forces, either independently or in combination. People who suffer from bruxism or bite on hard foods are more prone to developing cracks in their teeth. There is a difference between visible surface cracks & cts! not all surface cracks are of concern or cause pain. Cts typically causes pain on biting, even more on release. Nite guard? Read more...

Does this sound like cracked tooth syndrome? When I bite or chew hard things, it hurts in the left rear of my mouth and my dentist couldn't find anything on the x-ray. He said there was no cavity, and I can't figure out any other reason it would hurt..

This . This could indicate a cracked tooth, especially if it had a root canal. Unfortunately this is one of the hardest problems to diagnose. I would recommend an evaluation by an endodontist. A new technology called cbt (cone beam x-ray) is showing some promise in finding cracked teeth. You may just have to let the situation declare itself more before acting with insufficient evidence of what is truly wrong as it may lead to unnecessary treatment. Read more...
"Cracked . "cracked teeth" are often hard to detect. Some of the clues that we can use when xrays are normal include: 1. No prior restoration (filling) with pain to biting can suggest a crack/fracture. 2. Use of a tooth sleuth or bite stick to test different corners of the tooth could detect a weak point. 3. A cbct (cone beam ct) can help visualize a fracture 4. Pulp testing can determine if a particular tooth is more sensitive to thermal stimuli than other teeth. Read more...
Cracked . Cracked teeth are a challenge to diagnose. An endodontist is a good place to start, as they see this routinely. A tooth sleuth helps or a bite adjustment, and if so it likely will need a crown and maybe even a root canal.... Read more...

What does be the treatment for a cracked tooth?

Several options. Depending on the severity of the crack, you may need a filling, a crown (cap), a root canal or an extraction. Depending on the depth of your fracture and your other symptoms you can need any one of those previous treatments mentioned. Read more...
Go see a dentist. It might need a filling, a crown or an extraction depending upon the size and depth of the fracture. How can i logically answer such a broad question? Think about me having damage to my car. What should I do? Is it a scratch or half the car damaged? You need to be much more specific and logical. Read more...
Enamel crazing. Is superficial but a cracked tooth needs a more careful attention. There is a special light that can make it more visible. There is "cracked tooth syndrome" test that can be performed to clinically detect the severity of the symptom. The laser crown lengthening procedure can still save the tooth if the damage reached a little beyond the junction of the crown and root based on crown/root. Goodluck! Read more...
Treatment for CTS. Treatments for cracked tooth syndrome is not always successful. The tooth may be restored with a crown. About 28% of teeth with cracked tooth syndrome require root canals and crown. In more complicated cases the tooth may be extracted. Hope it helps. Read more...