What is the treatment for aspiration pneumonia?

Antibiotics. This is usually a mixed bacterial infection which is slowly progressive and treated with penicillin, clindamycin, and a host of other antibiotics depending upon the doctor's preference. Prolonged therapy may be necessary. It is also important to determine the cause of the aspiration, so that recurrence is minimized and that the primary problem is dealt with.

Related Questions

Suggest a best advice/Treatment for a 83 year old patient having aspiration pneumonia, history of two strokes, temporary high blood sugar and high BP?

Difficult problem. one might consider sleeping elevated. The history of strokes means a possible problem swallowing in which case a gastrostomy feeding tube may be the last resort. A modified barium swallow with speech pathology may provide more answers. Good luck. Read more...

Just had dinner with friends. They said a classmate just got diagnosed with aspiration pneumonia. I didn't know what to say. Why would someone get that?

Choking. Aspiration pneumonia occurs after someone inhales a substance into their lungs and the the resulting inflammation causes a lung infection to develop. This can occur after choking on food, a near-drowning event, severe reflux or certain chemical exposures among other reasons. Read more...
Several scenarios. Aspiration pneumonia usually occurs when someone inhales secretions or vomit. This can occur whenever someone has impairment in their level of consiousness and loss of protective airway protecting reflexes. This includes situations like head injury, epileptic seizure, intoxications, posionings, strokes, severe metabolic problems that cause stupor, and the list goes on. Read more...

What is the definition or description of: aspiration pneumonia?

Entry into lungs. Caused by entry of foreign material coming either from throat or stomach into the airways. The acidic stomach contents or accidentally ingested hydrocarbons induce a chemical pneumonitis, while aspiration of infectious organisms with secretions can also cause infection. Aspiration of mineral oil causes lipoid pneumonia. Treated with antibiotics & correction of underlying cause of aspiration. Read more...
Inhaling liquid. Our breathing and digestive systems both start from the throat. When we eat or drink something, our body stops our breathing for a moment until we finish swallowing. Then we breathe again. When we breathe with liquid in our throat, we are likely to suck the liquid into the lungs with the air. This is called aspiration. If it is irritating or infected, the problem is called aspiration pneumonia. Read more...

I've just been told I have aspiration pneumonia, should I be concerned?

Yes. Aspiration pneumonia is a serious but treatable lung infection which occurs after a foreign substance is inhaled into the lungs. Antibiotics will usually treat the infection but it is also important to uncover and treat the unlying cause of the aspiration. Read more...
Context important. Aspiration pneumonia occurs when bacteria (bugs) are accidentally inhaled into the lungs, causing inflammation & damage (ex. Inhaling vomit). The damage is higher in people with rotten teeth or gums (imagine-if these bugs can rot teeth- they do it to lungs too), causing potentially, a lung cavity unless treated with antibiotics that can kill microbes that can grow in oxygen-poor environments. Read more...

Explain the condition called aspiration pneumonia.?

Aspiration. Aspiration pneumonia occurs when foreign substance (usually vomit) is sucked into the lungs. Read more...
Inhaled secretions. Aspiration pneumonia refers to a kind of pneumonia that occurs when secretions or vomit are inhaled . This usually occurs when the normal airway protective reflexes are impaired, so in states where there is an altered level of consciousness. Read more...
Infection in lungs. This is a serious infection caused by breathing in something that is not supposed to be in the lungs, such as food, blood, vomit, or any other foreign matter. This can be a common problem with elderly people who may have had a stroke or some other problem which impairs their ability to cough. People are told not to eat or drink before anesthesia to reduce their risk of aspiration pneumonia. Read more...

Do people with aspiration pneumonia have a lot of pain?

No. Not typically, aspiration pneumonia is not typically painful, unless there is some complication of the pneumonia or a condition related that predisposed to aspiration is causing pain. Read more...