11 doctors weighed in:

I urinate very frequently. Am I getting diabetes type 1?

11 doctors weighed in
David Miller
Family Medicine
5 doctors agree

In brief: Rule out UTI

Aside from diabetes, another thing you should rule out with your doc is a urinary tract infection, which can cause urinary frequency and present without painful urination.
It can become chronic and cause problems. See your doc and get checked out.

In brief: Rule out UTI

Aside from diabetes, another thing you should rule out with your doc is a urinary tract infection, which can cause urinary frequency and present without painful urination.
It can become chronic and cause problems. See your doc and get checked out.
David Miller
David Miller
Answer assisted by David Miller, Medical Student
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Dr. Vered Lewy-Weiss
Pediatrics - Endocrinology
4 doctors agree

In brief: Not necessarily

Frequent urination is only a symptom of diabetes if it goes along with insatiable thirst.
Generally, lots of fluid is lost in the urine when blood sugars get high enough. This loss of fluid causes thirst because the high blood sugars cause so much urination that the body becomes dehydrated. It's especially noticeable at night because it keeps people from sleeping normally.

In brief: Not necessarily

Frequent urination is only a symptom of diabetes if it goes along with insatiable thirst.
Generally, lots of fluid is lost in the urine when blood sugars get high enough. This loss of fluid causes thirst because the high blood sugars cause so much urination that the body becomes dehydrated. It's especially noticeable at night because it keeps people from sleeping normally.
Dr. Vered Lewy-Weiss
Dr. Vered Lewy-Weiss
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Dr. Adam Nally
Family Medicine
3 doctors agree

In brief: Possibly

Freqent urination can be a sign of diabetes, however, it can also be a sign of an enlarged prostate, prostate infection, or a urinary tract infection.
Frequent urination can also be related to a water balancing hormone deficiency. A blood and urine test through your doctor will give you the answer.

In brief: Possibly

Freqent urination can be a sign of diabetes, however, it can also be a sign of an enlarged prostate, prostate infection, or a urinary tract infection.
Frequent urination can also be related to a water balancing hormone deficiency. A blood and urine test through your doctor will give you the answer.
Dr. Adam Nally
Dr. Adam Nally
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Dr. George Klauber
Pediatrics - Urology
1 doctor agrees

In brief: Worth testing

Most common reasons to urinate frequently are utis or drinking more.
Diabetes is also associated with increased thirst which is more obligatory than habitual. First get a urinalysis to rule out UTI or presence of sugar. Sugar in the urine is usually first abnormal test. Elevated bood sugar is much more suspicious of diabetes then a glucose tolerance test. Your primary dr. Should & will advise.

In brief: Worth testing

Most common reasons to urinate frequently are utis or drinking more.
Diabetes is also associated with increased thirst which is more obligatory than habitual. First get a urinalysis to rule out UTI or presence of sugar. Sugar in the urine is usually first abnormal test. Elevated bood sugar is much more suspicious of diabetes then a glucose tolerance test. Your primary dr. Should & will advise.
Dr. George Klauber
Dr. George Klauber
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Dr. Cayce Jehaimi
Pediatrics - Endocrinology
1 doctor agrees

In brief: Talk with PCP

Although there may be more reasons to urinate frequently beside being diabetic, it's good to check with your doctor especially if you have concomitant unexplained weight loss and excessive fluid intake.

In brief: Talk with PCP

Although there may be more reasons to urinate frequently beside being diabetic, it's good to check with your doctor especially if you have concomitant unexplained weight loss and excessive fluid intake.
Dr. Cayce Jehaimi
Dr. Cayce Jehaimi
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