I have diabetes type2 I take amlodipine besylate, lisinopril hctz (hydrochlorothiazide) 20-12, 5, medformin. Is it bad to ad simvastatin >?

Simvastatin can. help lower cholesterol levels. The HCTZ (hydrochlorothiazide), (hydrochlorothiazide) however, can cause increases in both glucose and cholesterol. There are other blood pressure medications which do not contain HCTZ (hydrochlorothiazide). Discuss w/your doctor.

Related Questions

Any problem with taking medformin HCl 500 (diabetic and high bp) with ic amlodpine besylate 5 mg and lisinopril hctz (hydrochlorothiazide) 20 12.5 mg cut in half in morning?

Should not be. Commonly used medications, including in that combination. Read more...
No problem, but... Metformin should be taken with meals, and 500 mg is a very low dose. It (immediate release metformin) needs to be taken twice a day to be effective and 2000 mg/d is the most effective dose if tolerated. Amlodipine is ok, but can cause some fluid retention, particularly in people with diabetes. The hctz (hydrochlorothiazide) can raise your blood sugar and increase your lipids. Higher Lisinopril w/o hctz (hydrochlorothiazide) would be better. Read more...

Looking to replace Norvasc as an add on to Lisinopril, HCTZ (hydrochlorothiazide). Worked well but very bad aches and pains. Bp raised after being off of it for a week but felt much better. 54 yr. Diabetic, healthy livestyl?

See your Dr! Did you just stop the Norvasc (amlodipine) on your own? Medication changes should always be under medical supervision and advice. You need to see your doctor and work with them to find the best solution for you. Please make appointment and see right away. . Read more...

Is it just as fine to take lisinopril/hctz versus taking lisinopril and amlodipine in a patient with a TIA with no recurrence in 9 months.

Choice of drugs. The answer to your question depends on how well controlled your blood pressure is on the lisinopril/hctz as opposed to it on amolodipine. The lower your blood pressure, without symptoms of hypotension, the less risk you have for strokes, heart attacks and renal failure in the future. Ask the physician (p) who wrote your prescriptions for advice, as your p knows your history better. Good luck. Read more...