What are the tests for popliteal aneurysm?

CTA and Arteriogram. Ctangiogram, arteriogram and arterial duplex of the popliteal artery.
Ultrasound. A high quality ultrasound is the best test to exclude a popliteal aneurysm. Don't delay and get checked out today! good luck!

Related Questions

How often should you have your popliteal aneurysm checked?

Annually. Once a year by ultrasound should be enough. You don't have to be concerned about treatment until it reaches a diameter of around 2cm. We don't worry about rupture. It is the formation of a blood clot and blockage of flow to the foot which is more likely to occur. These can be fixed surgically by replacing the short segment of artery or stenting. Read more...
Up to your surgeon. If you have popliteal artery aneurysm you are at risk for leg amputation. Doppler and cta will give needed info. May need surgery or covered stent soon depending on size of aneurysm, amount of clot in aneurysm and amount of associated peripheral artery disease. Otherwise your doctor will recommend follow up. You are at increased risk of abdominal aortic aneurysm so get an ultrasound of that area. Read more...

If I have a popliteal aneurysm, will I have other aneurysms in the future?

Possibly. The popliteal artery is the third most common location for a aneurysm. These frequently occur in both legs. Patients who have one aneurysm are more likely to develop others in the aorta and femoral ( groin ) and iliac arteries. These patients are followed closely for early detection. Read more...
More likely than not. Popliteal artery aneurysms occur with a bilateral presentation in over 50% of patients. AAA is also diagnosed in around 50% of patients presenting with popliteal aneurysms. Ultrasound tests can evaluate this possibility easily. Your risk to develop additional aneurysm where there currently is none, is hard to define, but certainly elevated. Read more...

What is the treatment for popliteal aneurysm?

Resection. Endo vascular stent if possible other wise resection . Read more...
Surgery or stent. Not all popliteal aneurysms need treatment. When indicated most patients are better served with a bypass surgery and ligation of the aneurysm or resection of the aneurysm and replace the artery with a graft. In high risk patients stenting is an option if they meet certain criteria. Read more...

Is it harmful to exercise with a popliteal aneurysm?

? mural thrombus. Mural thrombus is the build up of blood clot on the inside of an aneurysm. If the anurysm has mural thrombus in it, the risk of embolization, (i.e. Thrombus traveling down the arteries in the leg and causing blockage) is higher and would make exercise more risky. If the popliteal aneurysm has mural thrombus and is of appropriate size then repair, with stent graft or bypass surgery, is indicated. Read more...

What does it mean to have a popliteal aneurysm rupture?

Bleeding. The wall of the aneurysm has "split" and blood escapes. The speed of the bleeding depends on the location of the aneurysm and the surrounding structures which may support it. It is unusual for a popliteal aneurysm to rupture. It usually clots or causes clot and debris from inside the aneurysm to go downstream blocking the arteries. Both of these can lead to amputation. Read more...
Not good...see below. An aneurysm is an dilitation of a blood vessel. This is the result of weakening in the wall of the artery. The weakened wall can rupture, and bleeding into the tissues around the knee occurs, causing tremendous pain and swelling. The blood outside the artery can then impinge on flow to the lower leg and foot, causing ischemia. In all, very bad, and one of the reasons to fix aneurysms electively. Read more...

I have a large left popliteal aneurysm. When should I consider surgery?

Soon. Popliteal aneurysms rarely rupture but clot threatening limb ( leg & foot ) amputation, material inside can break off & block arteries "downstream", compress nerves or veins causing damage. When symptomtomatic, the risk of amputation is hign. Bending & straightening the leg at the knee "bends" the aneurysm making these compications more likely. Surgery if > 2 CM or have symptoms. Read more...
Soon. If you have a large aneurysm in the popliteal artery, it is at risk for thrombosing (clogging off) or embolizing (tossing debris), and puts you at risk for losing your leg. Larger aneurysms can also compress local structures and cause blood clots in your vein, or pain from pressure on the nerve. It is also possible for the aneurysm to rupture, but this is more common in aortic aneurysm. Read more...

How does a popliteal aneurysm affect sleep?

Two possibilities... It could be large enough that the person is aware of a pulsing sensation that keeps him awake. Alternatively, if the aneurysm is thrombosed (clotted), there could be compromised blood flow to the foot which causes pain at night because the leg is elevated (the blood flow is so limited that the person needs the benefit of gravity to get blood to the foot). Read more...