What are the tests for dupuytren's contracture?

None. There is no test for dupuytren's contracture other than the physical exam. Dupuytren's contracture is proliferation of collagen tissue in the hand. As the disease progresses, the fingers become bent and cannot be straightened. There are three treatment options at this time, surgery, needle aponuerotomy and Collagenase injection.
Psoriatic arthritis. In the hand we often see severe DJD of the distal joints with sawtooth patternson xray that can represent a varient of psoriatic arthritis which in more sever variants can cause joint destruction and so called pencil in cup joint erosions.
Great advice thus far. If you continue to have issues depsite treatment thus far you may need surgery to wah out the wound.
Testing is being worked on but not used yet. Expression of a novel gene, mafb, in dupuytren's disease http://www.Ncbi.Nlm.Nih.Gov/pubmed/16473681 here also is a link to an eloquent article by a very well know hand surgeon from the pre internet fame days http://www.Ncbi.Nlm.Nih.Gov/pmc/articles/pmc1305903/.
Table top test. there is no actual imagery done or test for dupuytren's . It is mainly diagnosed by physical exam by palpating the nodules and the cords and by doing the table top test asking the patient to try and lay their hand flat on a table and if they cant they have positive contracture that should be dealt with.
Table top test. The table top test is performed by trying to place your hand flat , palm down on a table top. If you cannot place your hand flat, that is a positive sign for contracture.
Some studies look 4. Expression of a novel gene, mafb, in dupuytren's disease http://www.Ncbi.Nlm.Nih.Gov/pubmed/16473681 here also is a link to an eloquent article by a very well know hand surgeon from the pre internet fame days http://www.Ncbi.Nlm.Nih.Gov/pmc/articles/pmc1305903/.
EXAMINATION. Dupuytren's is an abnormal fibro-proliferative disorder also called palmar fibromatosis know as vikings disease it has a significant familial and genetic etiology here is a link to some additional ideas on facebook regarding dupuytren's https://www.Facebook.Com/pages/dupuytrens-disease-new-treatment-updates/147337105335050?Ref=hl.

Related Questions

How common is dupuytren's contracture in the u.S.? Is there a lot of very mild cases that people don't know about?

3-4% of population. 3% to 4% of the population is the estimate. Read more...
3-6% incidence. Dupuytren's contracture affects 3-6% of the population of the United States. Cases vary btw very mild disease with nodules only, to severe cases with bilateral hand contractures, recurrence and involvement of the feet and/or penis. The disease is more common in people with northern european ancestry and has a strong family inheritance pattern. Read more...
Lower in US. Here also is a link to an eloquent article by a very well know hand surgeon from the pre internet fame days http://www.Ncbi.Nlm.Nih.Gov/pmc/articles/pmc1305903/. Read more...
3-6% 3-6 % is the most commonly quoted estimate. Higher in those with european heritage, especially northern europe. Read more...

What is dupuytren's contracture?

Fibrous knots . Hereditary fibrous knots that will develop in the hand and sometimes feet. Read more...
Fibrosis of ligament. Some people may be predisposed to this condition. Scaring of the ligaments to the hands and feet cause them to become fibrous and contract. You may develop bumps on the soles and palms causing the fingers and toes to curl or contract. Read more...
Fibromatosis. A hereditary disease of abnormal increase collagen formation. This primarily affects the hands causing finger contracture. It can also occur on the bottom of the feet (lumps) and cause a crooked penis. New treatments include needle aponeurotomy and xiaflex (collagenase clostridium histolyticum). Read more...
Fibromatosis. Dupuytren's is an abnormal fibro-proliferative disorder also called palmar fibromatosis know as vikings disease it has a significant familial and genetic etiology here is a link to some additional ideas on facebook regarding dupuytren's https://www.Facebook.Com/pages/dupuytrens-disease-new-treatment-updates/147337105335050?Ref=hl. Read more...

How typical is dupuytren's contracture?

Hereditary. Dupuytrens is an hereditary disorder found in northern europeans. It is fairly common in that ethnic group with varying degrees of penetration within the population. Read more...
3-6% in USA. Incidence is 3-6% in USA. More common in men, but women catch up in their 70's. It is a hereditary disease. Read more...
Dupuytrens disease. http://www.handctr.com/dupuytrens-disease-faq.html It is common in Northern European heritage but can be seen in any ethnicity or origin. Some say that Scandinavian countries have up to 30-40% of the population involved .http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1305903/ Treatments vary from observation, to Xiaflex (collagenase clostridium histolyticum) to aponeurotomy to surgery depending upon a variety of factors. Read more...

How can I cure dupuytren's contracture?

Dupuytrens. There is no cure . But there is treatment . See an orthopedist or orthopedic hand specialist for assistance . Read more...
Hand Surgeon. Hand surgeons take care of dupuytren's disease. Whether it is by a traditional open fasciectomy, removing the tissue or a limited procedure such as limited open fasciotomy or percutaneous needle aponeurotomy a hand surgeons experience and training is what is needed. For more information regarding newer treatments na and xiaflex (collagenase clostridium histolyticum) see http://www.handctr.com/dupuytrens-disease-faq.html. Read more...

What can cause dupuytren's contracture?

Fibroma formation. It is usually inherited. But some times trauma can be the cause. But your family genes is probably the reason. Read more...
PALMAR Fibromatosis. Dupuytren's is an abnormal fibro-proliferative disorder also called palmar fibromatosis know as vikings disease it has a significant familial and genetic etiology here is a link to some additional ideas on facebook regarding dupuytren's https://www.Facebook.Com/pages/dupuytrens-disease-new-treatment-updates/147337105335050?Ref=hl. Read more...
Hereditary. It is a hereditary disease. You need to have inherited the genes to get it. Read more...

How common is a dupuytren's contracture?

About 1 in 20 people. Typically affects people of northern european origin, less common in other ethnicities. Read more...
Heritage genes. It depends where you are form, as a gene that is expressed more poignantly and present more on those of northern european heritage, dupuytrens os sometimes called viking disease, although ive seen it in patients of every seemingly ethnic background. My joke with my patients is that those viking "got around a lot" a thousand years ago. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/pmc1305903/. Read more...
Common. it is present in 6% of the world caucasian population it is also seen in different races as well. Read more...

How do I know if I have dupuytren contracture?

Observe. Dippy tens is characterized by a significant thickening in the tendons of the palm usually at the ring or middle finger with loss of finger flexibility . The affected finger is usually held in a flexed position as there is loss of ability to extend the finger. If present see a hand surgeon for evaluation and treatment options. Read more...
Cord. There is usually a palpable and visible cord in the palm extending into the finger. The cord causes the finger to contract. Read more...
Cords and lumps. if you see lumps in your palm only u could have the beginning of dupuytren's . If you see cords causing flexion of your fingers you have dupuytren s full fledge. Read more...
Dupuytren is a. genetic familial disease, that is a progressive thickening of the fascia, a tough fibrous layer of tissue in the palm, Dupuytrens starts as nodules and can progress to cords causing joint contracture in the hand. http://handctr.com/dupuytrens-disease-faq.html and http://handctr.com/xiaflex-for-dupuytrens-information.html and https://youtu.be/aiMsrLECOOw?list=PLaYVr8V1oPuBXtJnqRkOJpzn8Js700CWP. Read more...

What can I do about a dupuytren's contracture?

4 options. Depending on how severe the contractures are, there are 4 possible options. Nodules and cords without contracture can be observed. Cords with contractures can be treated with open surgery (fasciectomy), needle apponeurotomy (percutaneous), or Collagenase injection (non-op). Dupuytren's disease is not curable and recurrence is common with all treatments. See a board certified orthopaedic hand doc. Read more...
Dupuytren's options. Dupuytens is a progressive disorder that at this point does not have a cure but has treatments. Traditional treatment observed until contracture was severe and surgery was offered. Some new alternatives include needle aponeurotomy, limited fasciaotomy and xiaflex (collagenase clostridium histolyticum) or collagenase http://www.Handctr.Com/dupuytrens-disease-faq.Html. Read more...
3 options. There are 3 options for treatment of dupuytren's contracture: 1) fasciectomy - long recovery 2) needle aponeurotomy - see my article in journal of hand surgery april 2012 3) xiaflex the treatment chosen will depend on the experience of your hand surgeon and the location and severity of the cords. http://www.centraljerseyhand.com/dupuytrens-contracture-surgery.htm. Read more...

What are the causes of dupuytren's contracture?

Mainly genetic. Dupuytren's contracture is usually seen in persons of northen european ancestry. There are associated diseases that can be seen in dupuytren's contracture, such as epilepsy, diabetes mellitus, and alcoholism. Dupuytren's contracture is not work-related or activity-related. Read more...
Not known. Some researchers believe that dupuytren's disease may be due to an autoimmune reaction, in which a person's immune system attacks its own body. A number of factors are believed to increase the risk of dupuytren's disease, including age, sex, ancestry, tobacco use, and disease such as diabetes and epilepsy (most likely associated with seizure medication). Read more...
Spontaneous. Whike there is an association with trauma, alcohol use, certain drugs and while there is some genetic basis, for all practical purposes it happens spontaneously. That is, there is really no good prevention. Focus is typically on treatment if contractures get bad enough. Read more...
Mostly genetic. Dupuytren's contracture is a fibroproliferative disorder with a strong family history. Almost 2/3's of people with this disease have an affected family member. There are some associations with diabetes, alcoholism, and the occasional post-injury case. For the most part it is transmitted within families with some northern european ancestry. Disease causes nodules, cords and finger contractures. Read more...
Fibromatosis. Dupuytren's is an abnormal fibro-proliferative disorder also called palmar fibromatosis know as vikings disease it has a significant familial and genetic etiology here is a link to some additional ideas on facebook regarding dupuytren's https://www.Facebook.Com/pages/dupuytrens-disease-new-treatment-updates/147337105335050?Ref=hl. Read more...
Hereditary. Most people believe the primary cause is genetic / hereditary. Trauma can stimulate the disease in someone with a predisposition. It is also associated with epilepsy, alcoholism and diabetes. Read more...