Is pulmonary fibrosis terminal?

Not good news. Pulmonary fibrosis means that the patient has developed abnormal tissue formation (fibrosis) that affects the thin membranes separating the air sacs from the blood vessels making it harder for oxygen to cross from air to the red bleed cells. This disease usually irreversible; it is critical to have an early diagnosis and be managed at an institution and by medical staff familiar with it.
Pulm Fibrosis. Hi, Pulmonary fibrosis can develop slowly or quickly. There is no cure. Many people with the disease live only about three to five years after diagnosis. The only treatment is lung transplant.

Related Questions

What is pulmonary fibrosis?

Scar tissue. The short version is scar tissue caused by inflammation in the lung. There are many different causes and subtypes though making it pretty complicated. Read more...

What is pulmonary fibrosis?

See below. It's a spectrum of diseases that cause a scarring of the lung. There are many causes from not knowing what causes it, to medications, dust exposure, autoimmune diseases, etc. Some of the types of fibrosis are progressive, some aren't. Some respond to treatment and some do not. Read more...

Is pulmonary fibrosis inherited?

Pulmonary fibrosis. While I have not seen it commonly there are some families with a history of pulmonary fibrosis. Most of my office patients and previous fibrosis patients I have come across are the only ones in their family with fibrosis. I have one patient in my practice with several family members with progressive and ultimately fatal fibrosis. She has been evaluated at duke university with a genetic workup. Read more...
Yes, rarely. Pulmonary fibrosis is a loose term. Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (ipf), if that is what you mean, is rarely inherited and there is a commercially available blood test to screen for it as well. Read more...

What is pulmonary fibrosis like?

Scarring. Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis is an inflammatory process affecting lung parenchyma and resulting in loss of lung storage and resulting in low diffusin capacity and restrictive lung disease. Cardiovascular effect inckude pulmonary hypertension and cor pulmonale. The disease is slowly progressive and unresponsive to all current therapy. Lifespan can be in months(hamman-rich) to a few years. Read more...

How is pulmonary fibrosis treated?

Options. Pulmonary fibrosis is treated with supportive care and oxygen. There are no drugs that have been proven to help at this time although a drug called pirfenidone has been studies and shows progress (it decreases progressive scarring of the lungs). There are also a number of drug trials ongoing in the US and elsewhere to try and find something that works. Read more...
Supportive care. Supplemental oxygen, good nutrition and breathing exercises may be of benefit. There is currently no effective treatment to prevent worsening of most pulmonary fibrosis. N-acetyl cyteine supplements are currently being studied along with a medication called perfenidone to see if outcomes are different. Read more...
Depends on the Dx. Pulmonary fibrosis is a loose term. Different ild's are treated differently. "idiopathic" pulmonary fibrosis (ipf) is one among more than 200 kinds of ild's . We do not have a very good treatment for ipf. Pirfenidone is the only drug approved outside of us for ipf (none in the usa). Read more...
Depends... It really depends on the type. If you're talking about idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, there's a new drug called pirfenidone. It slows the progression but it isn't curative. Read more...

What can cause pulmonary fibrosis?

Scarred Lungs. Pulmonary fibrosis is essentially scarring of the lungs. There are many different causes for the lungs to scar. The disease can be a long-term chronic problem however in certain cases if the underlying cause of scarring is not addressed, it can be fatal. Furthermore, idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis is almost uniformly fatal. Lung transplantation may be a final resort. . Read more...

What to expect in pulmonary fibrosis?

Slow progression... Pulmonary fibrosis is a slowly progressive disease. The patient gradually, usually over years, becomes increasingly short of breath and has increasing difficulty functioning. The patient has less oxygen in their blood over this time period and will eventually require supplemental oxygen. At end-stage, consideration for a lung transplant can be entertained, depending on many other factors. Read more...

Looking for info on pulmonary fibrosis?

Websites to start. Here are some links to useful places to start: http://www.Ncbi.Nlm.Nih.Gov/pubmedhealth/pmh0001134/ http://www.Mayoclinic.Com/health/pulmonary-fibrosis/ds00927/ http://www.Pulmonaryfibrosis.Org/about best of luck! Read more...
Scarring in lungs. Pulmonary fibrosis is scarring in the lungs. There are several types, the worst being idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (ipf), which is progressive disease that has no cure. The scarring can be from many causes, such as a previous infection or an exposure to a toxic substance or irritant. Smoking can also cause fibrosis. If you think you have this, you should get a full work up by your doctor. Read more...