What are the tests for vulvar cancer?

Physical and biopsy. Vulva can be observed directly for any suspicious lesions. If there are any, those can be biopsied for examination by a pathologist. Hpv infection is implicated in vulvar cancer like in cervical cancer.
Vulvar cancer. The best test for vulvar cancer is a tissue biopsy. Acetic acid (vinegar) is used to look for precancerous areas.

Related Questions

What exams and tests is needed to diagnose vulvar cancer?

Biopsy. To diagnose vulvar cancer you need to be examined by your doctor and he or she will need to do a biopsy of where they think the cancer is so that they can prove with tissue confirmation that you actually have cancer. Read more...

What is vulvar cancer?

Cancer. Vulvar cancer is a rare type of cancer. It forms in a woman's external genitals, called the vulva. The cancer usually develops slowly over several years, call your doctor if you are noticing a lump , rash and itching or having abnormal bleeding. Read more...
Genital cancer. Vulvar cancer is uncommon, a cancer of the external genitals of a woman. May present as a mass, an ulcerated abnormality, persistent nonhealing sore, lump. Generally in older women, takes time to develop. Just another reason to go for regular exams. Read more...

Who gets vulvar cancer?

Postmenopausal women. This cancer is fortunately relatively rare representing only 5% of gynecological cancers, occuring in post-menopausal women around 65 years old or so. It is becoming more common in women that in their 50's however. It is linked to human papilloma virus, the same one that causes cervical cancer. See your doctor if you have any abnormalities of the skin of the vulva. Read more...
Vulvar Cancer. You might want to review this article - http://www.Cancer.Org/cancer/vulvarcancer/detailedguide/vulvar-cancer-what-causes. At your age, you are unlikely to have to worry about it for at least another 30 years, but always be suspicious of "sores" that don't heal or white, raised plaques that don't scrape off. Read more...
Vulvar cancer . Women in their 30s & 40s with high risk hpv and older women with chronic vulvar irritation. Smokers in both age groups are at more risk. Read more...

How is vulvar cancer staged?

Stages I - IV. Stage i vulvar cancer is limited to only the vulva. Stage ii means the cancer has invaded surrounding structures (like the anus). Stage iii indicates spread to the lymph nodes. Stage IV is when the cancer has spread (metastasized) to distant parts of the body. Read more...
Read below. Staging is a way of describing a cancer, such as where it is located, if or where it has spread, and if it is affecting the functions of other organs in the body. Doctors use diagnostic tests to determine the cancer's stage, so staging may not be complete until all of the tests are finished. Knowing the stage helps the doctor to decide what kind of treatment is best and can help predict a patient'. Read more...
Vulvar cancer. I - local disease < 2 cm; no nodes ii - local disease >= 2 cm; no nodes iii - disease involves anus, lower vagina or one side nodes IV - distant mets, both side nodes, or bladder/ rectum. Read more...

How is vulvar cancer treated?

Depends. Usually the first line treatment for vulvar cancer involves surgery to remove the tumor and also to perform sampling of lymph nodes if necessary. Additionally, treatment may involve radiation, chemotherapy or a combination of the two. Lastly, reconstruction of the tumor removal site should be part of treatment. Read more...
Surgery. Assess nodes and invasiveness, probably post operative radiotherapy, possibly with chemotherapy. Read more...
Vulvar cancer. Invasive vulvar cancer is treated by radical excision o the cancer and a lymph nose dissection. Pre-cancer is treated most commonly by a local excision or laser ablation. Read more...
Vulvar cancer. Invasive cancer is treated by a radical evasion and lymph node dissection. Pre-invasive (which you probably have at your age) is treated by local excision or laser ablation. Read more...
Vulvar cancer. Pre-invasive (most common in young women in their 20s) is treated by local excision or laser ablation. Invasive vulvar cancer is treated by radical excision and lymph node dissection. Read more...
Vulvar cancer. Vulvar dysplasia (precancer) can be treated by surgery (cutting it out or destroying it with a laser) or occasionally with medicine. Invasive vulvar cancer is most commonly treated with surgery (removal of lesion and lymph nodes). Rarely, chemotherapy or radiation is used also for advanced disease. Read more...
Vulvar cancer. Treatment depends upon whether or not it is truly an invasive cancer. Pre-invasive only requires local excision. Invasive cancer of >1 mm depth requires a more extensive excision and lymph nodes. By far, the majority of vulvar cancers are stage i or ii and do not require any other therapy. Just close follow up. Read more...

How is vulvar cancer diagnosed?

By biopsy. If the physical exam of a troublesome area is suggestive, a biopsy of that skin area is used to make the diagnosis. Read more...
Biopsy. Physical examination of the lesion, a biopsy of the lesion and examination by a pathologist is needed for a diagnosis. Read more...

What are the causes of vulvar cancer?

Not exactly clear. The risk factors for vulvar cancer include cigarette smoking, vulvar dystrophy (eg lichen sclerosus), vulvar or cervical intraepithelial neoplasia, human papillomavirus (hpv) infection, immunodeficiency syndroms, a prior history of cervical cancer, and northern european ancestry. Read more...