Can Hypokalemic periodic paralysis cause hypoglycemia?

Electrolyte imbalanc. It is important for you to have small frequent meals to keep your glucose and electrolytes in balance. K and glucose will affect each other as will other electrolytes. Be very careful with this as K also will affect your heart and cause arrhythmias. Check your levels with your Dr and follow a health diet. Good Luck.

Related Questions

What can cause low t3, (liothyronine) hypoglycemia, hypokalemic periodic paralysis, weakness, jaundice in hands, extreme fatigue, hot flashes, numbness, bradycardia?

Sounds complex. This is a perfect question for HealthTap Prime, cuz each of these Sx need follow-up questions. 1st, low T3 (liothyronine) but what's the free T4? Hypokalemic Periodic Paralysis is associated w/ hypothyroidism. Do u have diabetes? Adrenal gland being affected? U seem to have some autoimmune phenomenon including jaundice (hepatitis). Does lupus run in ur family? Very strange mix of symptoms. Talk 2 a doc for Diagn. Read more...

Dx: hypokalemic periodic paralysis. I had Hyperglycemia 130-368 (usually hypo), High TSH10.8, K3.3 caused by carb meal and stress. Can Related to hkpp?

Endocrinologist. You have an underactive thyroid which should be treated and are advised to follow a no concentrated sweet,low starch diet to minimize spikes in blood sugar leading to eventual reactive hypoglycemia and drops in serum potassium which may exacerbate the hkpp. An endocrinologist is best to advise and follow you. Read more...

Can you tell me what exactly is hypokalemic periodic paralysis?

Hypokalemic dsiease. Hypokalemic periodic paralysis is a rare, autosomal dominant channelopathy characterized by muscle weakness or paralysis with a matching fall in potassium levels in the blood . For a full explanation of it go to this link: http://en.Wikipedia.Org/wiki/hypokalemic_periodic_paralysis. Read more...

I have hypokalemic periodic paralysis. Will I die from it or with it?

Genetic disorder. Hypokalemic periodic paralysis is an inherited disorder affecting the nerve cell membrane. Occasional attacks of muscle weakness, sometimes to the point of immobility occur. These often follow large meals, or upon awakening. Very rarely, the paralysis is so bad as to stop breathing, but if recognized and managed in an icu, death is not common. There are treatments to prevent attacks. Read more...
See resources. http://ghr.nlm.nih.gov/condition/hypokalemic-periodic-paralysis. Read more...

What is the cure for my hypokalemic periodic paralysis?

Low potassium levels. Hypokalemic periodic paralysis (hpp) is an inherited disease and has no cure and it can be managed by using the right medicines. People with hpp should rest after exercise, avoid high carbohydrate meals and sodium to avoid an attack. Acute treatment of hpp is Potassium Chloride iv. Chronically, acetazolamide, dichlorphenamide, or potassium-sparing diuretics decrease attack frequency and severity. Read more...
No cure. . It is incurable but can be managed. Make sure your thyroid function has been tested. Avoiding excessive vigorous exercise as well as high-carb foods can help prevent attacks. Potassium supplements would be indicated during acute attacks. Some medications such as acetazolamide and spironolactone may be useful but your doctor can tell you if they are appropriate in your case. Good luck! Read more...

What is hypokalemic periodic paralysis and how can one get over it?

Inherited disorder. Hypokalemic periodic paralysis is an inherited disorder that results in occasions temporary paralysis. Large meals can trigger attacks, especially the morning after. Treatment is possible with potassium supplements, or medications. It typical starts in the teens, but life span is usually normal, although persistent weakness may develop over years. It is very rarely fatal if recognized. Read more...

Does someone know anything about preventing hypokalemic periodic paralysis?

See your doctor. The way to prevent is to keep your levels stable. This includes a diet high in potassium rich foods. Also, some patients have a prescription for replacement potassium that they take either daily or when needed. It is important to discuss this with your physician. Read more...