Any doctors out there? Do I need test if carbon monoxide alarm went off?

Yes. If a carbon monoxide alarm is going off and suggests a high level you should not stay in your home. Even lower levels are toxic over time. With very high levels call 911. If you rent, immediately call your landlord or building manager. If you own your home, call a heating contractor to test for carbon monoxide and fix your appliance (e.g., stove, furnace, room heater, water heater, etc.).

Related Questions

Doctors, what are the biggest risk factors for carbon monoxide poisoning?

That's easy. The major risk factor for carbon monoxide poisoning is breathing in a lot of carbon monoxide. You don't need a doctor to tell you that; yout mother can tell you that. I'm not being rude; I'm pointing out that your question doesn't require any medical knowledge or expertise. It's something anyone can look up & understand. Check the websites of the CDC & the Consumer Products Safety Commission. Read more...

Do I need to see a doctor if I think I was poisoned by carbon monoxide?

Yes. A co level must be evaluated to decide on therapy! Read more...
Probably not. If you are alert enough to be asking this question and are no longer at the site where you might have been exposed to carbon monoxide, then you probably can wait out the condition while your body replaces its red cells. Read more...

What kind of testing is needed for chronic exposure to carbon monoxide and natural gas leaks? What kind of testing is needed for chronic exposure to carbon monoxide and natural gas leaks from gas furnace? Or what type of doctor to see? Chronic exposure

The . The best way to find thorough testing in your area is to contact your local poison center. They will be able to direct you to a toxicologist who can guide you in the right direction. Read more...
Carbon . Carbon monoxide poisoning -- whether acute or chronic -- is determined by measuring your carboxyhemoglobin levels. In cases of overexposure, your carboxyhemoglobin level will be elevated, but it will only remain high as long as you continue to be exposed to carbon monoxide. It is very difficult to document carbon monoxide poisoning (or exposure to natural gas leaks) two years after exposure ceased. There have been scattered reports of chronic, low-level carbon monoxide exposure leading to permanent memory loss, tremors, or learning disorders, but it isn't clear if such exposures cause permanent neurologic damage in all people. If you are having persistent symptoms you believe are related to carbon monoxide exposure between 1999 and 2009, a neurologist might be able to sort things out. Sometimes a brain MRI reveals characteristic changes in people who have experienced chronic carbon monoxide exposure. I hope that helps! Read more...