Whats done when testing for prostate cancer?

Screening. Testing involves a rectal exam to assess prostate size and figuring out prostate symptoms/signs. After age 50, a psa test is typically done.
Rectal and PSA. A rectal examination and a blood test for prostate specific antigen (psa) are the usual procedures for intial testing. If there is suspician of cancer, needle biopsy of the prostate, through the rectum, is done and tissue set for examination by a pathologist.

Related Questions

Can there be a way to do self-testing for prostate cancer?

No self test. Prostate cancer v. rare at age 39-years. Urinary symptoms of slow urinary stream & frequent urination usually from other causes. Not associated with pain unless spread to spine. PSA is blood test for prostate cancer. Digital rectal exam. by Dr. can detect suspicious nodule. Self-testing not possible. Read more...

Do you recommend genetic testing such as is offered by personalized genomics companies? Prostate cancer seems to run in our family

Not ready yet. There is some but limited guidance available for genomic testing in certain cancers. Prostate cancer is not one of those, at least it is not well defined for individual use. Read more...
Genetic counsellor . Is probably the better person to evaluate your risk: personalized genetic tests are still not validated rigorously. Read more...
Screening. If you are healthy and have a family member with prostate ca you should consider screening at age 40. Read more...

At what age do I need to start being tested for prostate cancer?

Age 40. The american urological association recommends prostate cancer screening for men age 40 and older. The interpretation of the results as well as the recommended follow-up are effected by many things including patient age, medical status, prior psa levels (if available), prior biopps biopsy results (if available), race, and family history. Read more...
Depends. This is a controversial topic in modern medicine. I would recommend you have a lengthy discussion with your doctor regarding the necessity for screening. Things like family history, symptoms, etc all come into play. You also need to be aware of the potential adverse effects of screening. You need to make an informed decision that goes beyond the kind of answer we can give you on this site. Read more...
Depends. Prostate cancer typically occurs in older patients. Screening is usually performed with the prostate specific antigen test (psa). However before choosing to undergo screening, it is important to understand the possible outcomes of this testing. Not all prostate cancers are life threatening and treatment carries some risks of its own. Read more...

When is it most important for men to get tested for prostate cancer?

Examination & PSA. Examination of prostate , elivation of psa levels, and biopsy is still gold stranded for diagnosis .Now the tumor marker pca3 is available, which specific for cancer tested from urine. It is useful when biopsy is negative with high psa level, to monitor micro disease, and after treatment, . Read more...
Not needed? The uspstf recommends against psa-based screening for prostate cancer. http://bit.ly/nmvhid. Short and sweet. Any questions? Read more...
YES. Recent press has suggested men do not need to be screened but this ignores the fact that the death rate from prostate ca has fallen and the number of men with metastatic prostate ca is much lower. Men 40-65 should be screened especially if they have a family history, are overweight, have low testosterone, etc. Deciding what to do with the results of screening should be decided with their md. Read more...

Is. Turp done to fix prostate cancer?

Palliation. Turp can be used to treat men with prostate cancer who have problems urinating. Turp cannot be used to cure prostate cancer because it removes only the parts of the prostate that are closest to the urethra, while leaving the majority of the gland intact. Because turp, when used in men with prostate cancer, is meant to relieve symptoms but not to cure the cancer, it is called a palliative procedure. Read more...
Turp. Turp (transurethral resection of the prostate- removing a part of the prostate through the urethra) is a surgery used to relieve urinary obstructive symptoms from an enlarged prostate caused by benign prostatic hyperplasia (bph). It is not a treatment for prostate cancer; however, prostate cancer at times is indentified through turp. Read more...
No. TURP will make the urine have a stronger flow rate but will not remove the cancer. I assume you have received treatment for the cancer with external beam radiationor seed implants.I hope this answers your quesion. Read more...

My grandpa & great grandpa had aggressive prostate cancer & I have multiple genetic markers for it. I am 31. What tests should I have done 2 b safe?

See below. Even in men with genetic risk factors for prostate cancer, it is not recommended to be screened for the disease until after age 40. A that time, you should have a psa test and rectal exam. Hopefully, by then, we may have a better screening test than the psa. It is good to have knowledge of your family medical history, as it will help your doctor look for diseases for which you are at higher risk. Read more...
Prostate cancer. I would get a psa test at age 40 given your family history if anybody in your family was diagnosed in there early 50s maybe age 35....But that may be overly aggressive. Read more...

I did a genetics with 23andme; I have a high chance of prostate cancer. Is that grounds to get my psa done prior to turning 45? And make insurance?

Prostate screening. The national comprehensive cancer network (nccn) recommends screening for high risk men (either through testing or family history) be screened with psa and rectal exam at age 40. I would recommend discussing this with your doctor. Read more...

Good evening, pt with prostate cancer & TURP done for him in 2010 & now on hormonal therapy but the tpsa level increased > 70. Why? What to do? Thanks

Biochemical relapse. Most likely this is a case of biochemical relapse. However, metastatic disease should be ruled out ( ct scan, bone scan) . If there is no site of metastatic disease- then it is biochemical relapse. Then in that case, he should see a radiation oncologist for local radiation to the prostatic area, in addition to hormonal therapy. Discuss further with oncology team. Read more...
Castrate resistant. I am not certain exactly what form of hormone deprivation he is on, but if it is an lhrh agonist or orchidectomy and the psa climbs, it typically means the cancer is "escaping" the effect of androgen deprivation. A review of his meds with an oncologist would be helpful and possibly add other drugs or consider next line therapy if his health permits. Best of luck to you. Read more...