How to screen or test for ovarian cancer?

No sure test. There is no established screening test fit for mass use. Blood tests such as ca125 level has been used. Scannng such as pelvic ultrasound or ct scans have ben employed too.
No good test. There is no good screening test for ovarian cancer. Women with vague abdominal complaints should consult their doctors as that is often the only symptom in early cases.

Related Questions

Can we screen for ovarian cancer?

Yes. Screening is not definitive, but it consists of the pelvic exam and the pelvic sonogram if indicated. The fda has just approved a blood screening test, but the statistics associated with it are not impressive. Read more...
There is no. Effective method to screen: blood test, image, so we rely on symptoms and annual exam. Genetic testing in those with risk. Read more...

Should I screen my children for ovarian cancer genes since it seems to be so deadly? There is no history in my family.

No. There is no simple screen for ovarian cancer susceptibility beyond the breast-ovarian cancer gene (brca) testing that costs $2600-3300. Only families with cases of ovarian or early onset (<45) breast cancer should consider this testing. Read more...
Cancer screening. Even though deadly- without a family history - screening has not been proven to be beneficial either from a survival or economical standpoint. Definitely there are ovarian cancers that are part of the genetically predisposed (brca etc), but these are associated with definitive family involvement. Age and hormone exposure are also related to increased risk. Read more...
No. Testing for cancer genes is a very important part of cancer risk assessment and prevention. Family history is the tool that is used to determine if someone needs testing. If their is no family history then you do not need to test. Read more...

Is there a genomic test for ovarian cancer?

Not a single test. Different cancers have different genetic anomalies predisposing to different types of cancers. Even cancers of the ovary have multiple anomalies that are thought to be causative. Brca 1 & 2 (same genes involved in breast cancer) abnormalities are associated with increased incidence of ovarian cancer. Read more...
Yes. Many genes have been identified that may increase your risk of ovarian cancer from the normal <1% risk to a doubling or up to a 40% lifetime risk. The best validated gene is the brca gene. The new next generation sequencing technology can check for 19 genes at once that increase risk of breast, ovarian and uterine cancer. This may be helpful if you have a family history of ovarian cancer. Read more...

How do you test for ovarian cancer in women?

Nothing good. Unfortunately there is nothing that's accurate. We sometimes use ultrasound and a blood test called CA125 to screen very high risk people like those with a family history of ovarian/breast cancer or Ashkenazi Jewish. However, even in this group we are not very good at preventing ovarian cancer and making people live longer. There are some tests in development and hopefully it will be reality soon. Read more...

Is there an xray or similar test for ovarian cancer?

Transvaginal U/S. Transvaginal u/s (ultrasound) is essential to the initial workup for ovarian cancer, along with pelvic exam, and ca-125 testing. Read more...
No. There are no tests that have been shown to reliably screen for ovarian cancer. Some people advocate for pelvic us and tumor marker analysis but these tests have not been shown to lead to improvements in ovarian cancer outcomes. Read more...
Ultrasound. An ultrasound of the pelvis may reveal a mass in the ovary that would then need to be investigated to diagnose or exclude cancer. Read more...

What is the ca-125 test for ovarian cancer?

Measures a protein. The ca-125 test is a blood test that detects a protein in the blood that is produced by malignant ovarian cells. It is used to help determine if an ovarian cancer patient has had a relapse, or to help differentiate a cyst found by sonogram or ct. The most important point: it should never be used as a yearly screening test, and should not be requested by patients as a screening test. Read more...