Related Questions

What to do if I have carotid artery disease?

It depends. It depends on the severity. Anything along the spectrum of lifestyle changes, to medication, to surgery may be indicated. Speak with your doctor about your particular situation. Read more...
See your doctor. . Aspirin often prescribed. Sometimes plavix (clopidogrel) if you are symptomatic. A statin is often needed to control cholesterol and to stabilize the plaque in your neck. Follow up carotid doppler test. Control high blood pressure. Control blood sugar and diabetes. Time to start exercising if ok with your doc. NO smoking please:) Read more...
Multiple approaches. Depending on the severity and degree of disease and percent of blockage, a carotid endarectomy may be warranted. However, even with surgery, medical and lifestyle treatments are part of overall treatment plan. Stop smoking, optimize/control your blood pressure, cholesterol, and diabetes are crucial to long term management. Antiplatelet therapy such as aspirin and Plavix (clopidogrel) may be prescribed. Read more...
See Vascular Surgeon. Vascular Surgeons are considered "experts" in medical, surgical, & interventional management of carotid artery disease. If the disease is significant (ask you primary doctor), then seek consultation. Medical therapy includes aspirin, statin drug, smoking cessation, low fat diet, & hypertension control. If stenosis is severe then would be considered for surgery or stent of the artery. Ultrasound. Read more...

How do you diagonise carotid artery disease?

Multiple modalities. Carotid ultrasound is the least invasive of the tests. Mr angiography requires a patient to lie in a confined space. The quality of the images is dependent upon no movement during the study. Ct angiography requires iodine-based contrast dye. Patients with chronic renal disease may have special preparations before their study. The gold standard is most invasive, arterial angiography. Read more...
Imaging. There are a variety of non invasive imaging modalities that can be used to identify carotid artery disease. These include ultrasound, MRI and ct techniques. Angiography is often used as a confirmatory test when the above studies suggest narrowing. Read more...

What are the tests for carotid artery disease?

Ultrasound. The first and easiest test is the carotid ultrasound. This will identify if there is any carotid disease. I there is significant disease the most vascular surgeons would recommend either ct angiography or mr angiography. Read more...
Duplex ultrasound. First best test is duplex ultrasound . Other test like ct angiogram or mr angiogram could be done . The most invasive but gold standard is conventional arteriography. Read more...
Start. With physical exam and carotid ultrasound. Cta or mra may follow. See stroke and carotid disease at www.Sirweb.Org for good info. Read more...

Describe the features of carotid artery disease.?

Ischemic stroke. Carotid artery disease usually occurs at the origin of the internal carotid artery at the neck and results from plaque build up. The main concern is that blood clots may for from turbulent blood flow this plaque causes, and the clot may travel upward and block an important brain artery, causing a stroke. It is a common found and commonly treated cause for stroke. Several options exist. Read more...
Range of findings. A milder form of carotid artery disease is transient ischemic attack, or tia, which can lead to visual symptoms of intetrmittent brown out or darkened vision, called amaurosis fugax. If you have these epeisodes, see your eyemd right away. Read more...

Seeing spots symptoms of carotid artery disease?

Very rarely,if ever. Usual is amaurosis fugax, like a shade coming down over the vision of one eye only, but not both.An unusual variation is bright light amaurosis, brought on in one eye when in bright light, because the extra light puts more demand on the retina.The key in all vision changes with carotid disease is that it is monocular, a point missed by most practitioners.If a symptom affects both eyes, not carotid! Read more...
Not typically. Cartid artery stenosis can cause loss of vision in one eye as if u pull a black shade in front of it but not typically causes seeing spots. Read more...

I'm seeing spots with carotid artery disease, is that bad?

It may be. The two can be related. Please see the link below. You should definitely talk to your doctor about this. http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/000784.htm. Read more...
Please. Be evaluated by an opthalmologist as well as by your doctor and or a neurologist. You may need an eye exam, a carotid doppler and possibly a trans cranial doppler. These will direct medical vs surgical treatment options. Read more...

What lifestyle changes can I make to decrease my risk for carotid artery disease?

DO NOT SMOKE. Smoking is probably the single worst thing that a human could do to themselves to increase the risk of peripheral vascular disease. Improving other risk factors such as hypertension, diabetes and hypercholesterolemia also need to be addressed in the journey to decrease the chance of peripheral vascular disease. Read more...
Many. Lose weight, lower your cholesterol, control your diabetes, lower your blood pressure, lower your stress. These are all within your power to affect but it will take some work on your part. Read more...

What is carotid artery disease?

Carotid stenosis. In the carotid arteries the flow of blood goes from being linear to being turbulent due to the "fork in the road" at the bifurcation. This causes the area of the proximal internal and external carotid arteries to develop plaque. This plaque leads to narrowing of the artery. The material that is causing the narrowing is fragile and can break off and cause a stroke. Read more...
Vascular disease of . Vascular disease of the carotid artery.Perhaps narrowing of the vessel. The disease may lead to a stroke since the brain is not getting adequate blood flow or perhaps a plaque may break off and lodge in a blood vessel in the brain. Read more...