Should I be concerned if small calcifications show up on a digital mammogram?

Maybe. The majority of times calcifications seen on mammogram represent benign (not cancer) changes. However, new calcifications, or those that are different shapes/sizes or appear to be distributed along the length of a milk duct could indicate cancer so needle biopsy is sometimes recommended. Comparison to old mammograms can be helpful to determine if biopsy is needed or not.
Maybe. Most of the calcifications that show up on mammography are of no concern. Some will require follow up or biopsy. Based on their size, shape, and distribution, the radiologist will be able to determine how the calcifications should be handled.
NO. Let the radiologists worry, there are both benign and suspicions calcifications that can be seen on mammography. The radiologists will decide if additional imaging is necessary or a short interval mammogram would be appropriate.

Related Questions

If small calcifications show up on a digital mammogram, should you be concerned?

Depends. There are different patterns of calcification that experienced radiologists can tell you when they read a mammogram which can help in terms of evaluating the possibilities of whether the caclification is likely to be benign or suspicious for malignant process. Certainly it has to be followed up but does not mean that you have to worry about all calcification discuss further with your oncologist. Read more...
Depends. Calcifications can be benign or malignant. Things that would raise concern or determine if you need immediate biopsy are: your age, prior mammogram history (i.e. Where these present or absent in the past), palpable mass, breast history, prior surgery, family history. At a minimum you need a follow up mammogram in 3-6 months. You should follow up with a breast specialist. Read more...
Not necessarily. The majority of women undergoing mammography will have calcifications on their mammogram. A small percentage will need to be looked at closer and may require a biopsy. Read more...
Maybe. Most of the calcifications that show up on mammography are of no concern. Some will require follow up or biopsy. Based on their size, shape, and distribution, the radiologist will be able to determine how the calcifications should be handled. Read more...

If small calcifications show up on a digital mammogram, should I be concerned about cancer?

Yes. Microcalcifications on a mammogram can be a sign of cancer and need follow-up. Magnification mammography can be helpful in evaluating calcifications for malignant (cancer) characteristics. If there is any question about the nature of the calcifications, biopsy will necessary. Read more...
Need follow up. Calcifications can be benign or malignant. If malignant, it is usually a early, treatable cancer. If calcifications are on a mammogram that were not present before, you need additional mammogram views. This includes magnification for a better look. In most instances, it will be recommended to repeat the views in 3-6 months. In some cases a biopsy may be necessary. Read more...
Maybe. Most of the calcifications that show up on mammography are of no concern. Some will require follow up or biopsy. Based on their size, shape, and distribution, the radiologist will be able to determine how the calcifications should be handled. Read more...

If small calcifications show up on a digital mammogram and not on a breast sonogram. Should I be concerned?

Not yet. It's not that simple. You should be concerned only when your surgeon tells you to be concerned. There is not enough information in your story to make a decision like that. Read more...
Calcifications. Small calcifications may be difficult or impossible to visualize on ultrasound, while being relatively easy to see on the mammogram. The fact that the calcifications are not seen on US doesn't make them any more or less suspicious. Speak to your doctor about the next steps to take. Read more...