Would would you get the breast cancer genetic testing?

Risk for cancer. If you have a strong family history of breast or ovarian cancer (or less commonly prostate or pancreas), if you had cancer before certain age, or breast cancer with certain characteristics, you may be a candidate for brca testing. Please note that this should be done in a setting of a full risk assessment visit by a trained professional.
Family history. It depends on the family history of the person.
Family history. It may be useful for a woman with strong family history of breast cancer to get genetic testing done. Even in that case the woman should consider what she would do with the results before getting the tests done. It is best to consult your doctor to detemine if a genetic test may be warranted.

Related Questions

Who should get breast cancer genetic testing?

Family history. It may be useful for a woman with strong family history of breast cancer. Even in that case the woman should consider what she would do with the results before getting the tests done. It is best to consult your doctor to detemine if a genetic test may be warranted. Read more...
Start w/affected pt. Pesonal and family risk factors assoc w/brca mutation: muliple fam members, bil breast cancer, male breast cancer, ovarian cancer, ashkenazi jewish heritage (specific founder mutations), diagnosis age <50 (dx age < 60 if er/pr/her2 - or triple negative). Both maternal and paternal history is important. Read more...

Is there any routine breast cancer genetic testing?

Yes. If you have strong family history of breast cancer (mother, sister) and worry about genetic correlation, then talk to your doctor about testing for brca 1 and brca 2 genes. Read more...
For significant risk. It is not a routine test for everybody with breast cancer. However, if you have significant risk with more than one family member having breast cancer or ovarian cancer , at younger age especially or multiple other type of cancers in the family- a brca 1 and 2 analysis would be something that routinely be done to rule out breast-ovary hereditary syndrome. Read more...

What is the price for breast cancer genetic testing?

3K. Brca comprehensive test offered by myriad is about $3, 000. They have an additional test called bart which used to be charged separately but now is often done as one. Frankly, i don't know if that adds to the cost. These are covered by most insurances if ordered in the right setting. Others labs have developed tests (such as breastnext) for other genes but insurance coverage is not as clear cut. Read more...
Genetic testing. The testing of the brca 1 and 2 genes can cost up to $3500. It depends on whether or not there is a specific change that is known for which to look. You can call myriad genetics 800.469.7423. Read more...

Can you tell me if given the oppurtunity to get genetic testing for the breast cancer gene should I do it?

What do you mean? Genetic testing is a valuable but expensive tool that can save lives if properly used. If you went to a geneticist or a specialist in cancer genetics and were advised to do it, i would suggest you go for it. It should be in the setting of proper genetic counseling. Some genetic labs want to make it look as if it's "just a blood test" but it is not. Read more...
Informed decision. No one can tell you if genetic testing is right for you; it is your decision. See a genetic counselor or geneticist to go over all of the pros and cons of genetic testing before you make your decision. The goal of genetic counseling is to help you have all the information you need to make an informed, personal decision. Read more...

How many relatives need to have had breastcancer before you should get genetic testing for the BRCA genes? My mother contracted breast cancer, I am 40

Other factors must . be considered. If your mom had a harmful BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation, breast cancer diagnosed before age 50, cancer in both breasts, both breast and ovarian cancers, multiple breast cancers or your ethnicity is Ashkenazi Jewish, talk to your GYN about genetic counseling to evaluate your potential risk. Read more...
Usually 2. With some exceptions, the number is two first-degree relatives (mom/sisters), before screening for BRCA. Exceptions include if there is a history of ovarian cancer, pre-menopausal breast cancer (age . Read more...
See genetics. Most breast cancer is NOT due to an inherited risk, but rather occurs by chance. Family history that suggests an inherited risk, such as changes in the BRCA1 gene or BRCA2 gene, include multiple relatives with cancer over more than one generation and younger ages of onset. If you are concerned about an inherited risk, see a geneticist who can assess your family history. Read more...

Should I have genetic testing for breast cancer if family history?

Maybe. If in doubt go to a genetics counselor - most cancer centers have one. The consultation is not expensive, but the test itself is. They will ask about your age, the exact numbers of family members affected, their age at diagnosis, whether one or both breasts, their relationship to you (mother, sister, or daughter increase your personal risk), other cancers in the family. Then they can advise you. Read more...
Perhaps. The risk factor/indications for genetic testing are: multiple family members with a history of breast cancer, bilateral breast cancer, male breast cancer, ovarian cancer, ashkenazi jewish heritage, young age of diagnosis (<50 but really premenopausal particular early 40s-30s), triple negative (er/pr/her2-) status and age <60. Read more...

How much does genetic testing for breast cancer cost?

Depends. If you are paying cash it is expensive. Over $1000. But if you are a risk or qualify, it may be covered by your insurance. Call your insurance and see if they cover it. Read more...
Depends. If you have a valid reason to be tested-first degree family members, breast cancer under age of 50, others in family with brca positive test (to name a few)-then it should be covered by your insurance carrier. Depending on your insurance plan and deductible, there may not be any out of pocket cost. Read more...

What can I do if my mom was diagnosed with breast cancer. Should I think about getting genetic testing?

It depends. Most breast cancers are not genetically passed down to daughters but some are. You need to learn more about genetic breast cancer. Unless your mother has other blood relatives with breast or ovarian cancer, you do not need genetic testing unless your mother had breast cancer before the age of 50 years. However you should take precautions for early detection and get clinical breast examination regu. Read more...

My mom had two types of very aggressive breast cancer. I'm almost 30, would it be wise to ask for genetic testing?

Yes. For femalles with any first degree relative mother sister grandmother with breast caner should consider the bracca genetic testing. While not 100% it will tell you what your relative risk is and allow more agressivive monitoring with mammograms and perhaps mris. But it may along with counseling help you decided what you would like to do to prevent the risk or watch more closely to catch it early. Read more...
Yes. It depends on other factors, like your mom's age at diagnosis. If she was under 50, and particularly if you have other first-degree relatives with breast cancer (sister, daughter) or ovarian cancer, you may be at risk for carrying the brca gene. Ask for genetic counseling instead of genetic testing, as the type of test you need depends on a more extensive review of your history. Good luck! Read more...
Possibly-for mom 1st. Risk factors for possible brca mutation are family histories that include multiple family members, bilateral or multiple cancers in one family member, male breast cancer, young age of diagnosis (<50/premenopausal esp early 40s/30s), ovarian cancer, & certain ethnic groups (ashkenazi jewish). Current guidelines also include triple neg & age <60. Testing should start with an affected indiv first. Read more...
Yes. The best person to test is your mother since she is at very high risk of having a positive due to her double primary breast cancer. If she is positive, you have a 50% chance of being positive. If she is no longer alive, you can be tested, but even if you are negative, you are still at high risk of breast cancer since we don't know if your mother was positive or negative. Read more...