Is biopsy tooth extraction more expensive than simple extraction?

Yes. If there is unusual pathology associated with the extraction, a sample is sent to a pathology lab where it is prepared, examined and diagnosed. The extra cost is worth the peace if mind.
Sure. Of course it is. Medical protocol dictates when tissue associated with a tooth should be biopsied. Follow the advice of the person doing the extraction.
Probably the combo. If a biopsy tooth extraction involves an extraction and also a biopsy, i believe it would cost more than just an extraction. Also, anytime there is a biopsy, the material cut out may go to a pathology lab, to see what is in it and to look for bad things such as cancer. The pathology lab and the pathologist (another doctor) both must be paid, adding to the costs.

Related Questions

How expensive is a general tooth extraction?

Depends. Location and who you see make a difference. An Oral Surgeon in your area will likely charge about $150 - 200 , not including the exam and x-ray imaging. Your General family dentist might charge $ 125 - 145, as well as any exam and imaging fees. In town (Philly) the fees would be higher. Surgical extraction considerably higher. Good Luck. Read more...
$75-$450, average. depending on the tooth, the type of anesthesia, the dentist and the local cost of living and individual cases. Read more...

How expensive is a tooth extraction?

Varies. Fees vary from office to office, city to city. A specialist will charge more than a generalist. Being put to sleep ? That's an additional expense. Any number given over the internet is meaningless, since fess in deltona are not the same as los angeles or albany or el paso. Read more...
Depends. No way to answer this question...Varies from region to region across the country and varies on severity of the extraction...Surgical/non-surgical, etc. Read more...

Are the chances of developing a dry socket higher with surgical tooth extraction vs simple tooth extraction? How likely is it after 6 days of simple?

Dry socket. Dry socket literally the loss of the blood clot from the extraction site. Often-times with a surgical extraction, the wound is larger and the trauma greater- increasing the chances of dry socket. Regardless of the severity of the extraction, after 6 days dry socket should not be an issue any longer. Though complications could still include infection. Read more...
No. Dry sockets happen when there is a loss of blood clot from the extraction socket, it could happen in both simple or surgical extractions ( actually less chance in surgical extractions since we usually close the surgical with stitches ). The chance of dry socket would be less if you could have any kind of socket augmentation. Read more...
Dry socket. I don't believe there is ever a "simple" extraction, because issues can arise with any type of extraction. I frequently get calls from people wanting to know the fee for a "simple" extraction. Anyway since we don't always know what causes a dry socket it can't be predicted. Usually the symptoms appear (pain, bad taste) within a couple of days after the extraction. Read more...
Dry socket. Once a tooth is extracted a clot forms in the socket to allow regrowth of bone. The extent of the socket and more so how the person takes care of the socket will determine whether you get a dry socket, which is the loss of the clot. No suction, gentle cleaning, etc will help. Six days post usually the clot is adhering and tissue is growing over, sutured will do even better. See surgeon if problem. Read more...
No, nil. The cause of dry socket is not well understood and may occur regardless of the difficulty of the procedure. Rather than the actual procedure, i find it occurs more often when a patient smokes, has poor general health, and does not follow post-operative instructionsl. When it does occur, it occurs approximately 2-3 days after the extraction. By 6 days you should be fine, unless it gets infected. Read more...
NO. Dry socket is caused by infection causing loss of clot covering the wound and expose bone to the oral environment. It usually starts on day number 3 after extraction. It occurrence usually due to the body inability to prevent or contain an infection (smoker, stress, alcohol, diabetes, medical or immuno-compromise individuals). Read more...

Do oral surgeons intubate pt. For tooth extraction? Is it a simple intubation or is it rsi? Any paralytic involved?

Generally no. Local anesthetic in the mouth, sometimes nitrous as well. Read more...
Intubation for teeth. First, it is a serious mistake to assume intubation is ever "simple"! it isn't. Second, in the office setting, tooth extraction is rarely done on the intubated patient, and paralytics are unnecessary. Simply put, et tubes get in the way. Even difficult extractions and oral can be done in complete comfort--safely--with full monitoring, deep sedation/general anesthesia and expert airway management. Read more...