Is early diagnosis important? How is testicular cancer diagnosed?

Testicular mass. Testicular cancer is most commonly diagnosed due to painless mass in the testicle. Testicular tumors can grow quite rapidly (with a doubling time of approximately 36 hours), so it is imperative that you see your physician urgently if you do feel mass in one (or both) of your testicles. He/she will be able to order the appropriate tests and get you in to a urologist for treatment.
Testicular exam. Usually by the owner, noting change in size or shape. Early seems better always; however, in testis, even delay does not compromise chance at cure.

Related Questions

Can you tell me about early cures for testicular cancer?

? Not sure what you mean by "early cures" but I can tell you that as a rule, testicular cancer is very curable (even in patients with advanced disease) with surgery plus or minus chemotherapy or radiation therapy. Look for additional info at cancer.gov. Read more...

Could you tell me what are some early signs of testicular cancer?

Mass. A lump that seems to be getting bigger. A change in the size of the testicle. A area in the testicle that feels hard or "gritty". A area of the testicle that feels as if there is some missing or soft. Read more...

Would blood tests diagnose testicular cancer?

Testicular cancer. Not all testicular cancers can be diagnosed by blood test however elevated ldh, HCG AFP are elevated in most testicular cancers. Read more...
Some can help.. The diagnosis of testicular cancer requires a tissue biopsy to determine that cancer is present and the specific type. There are some tumor markers for testicular cancer that can be detected in the blood to help determine response to chemotherapy and disease activity. These are not present in all patients with testicular cancer and are not used for the actual diagnosis of the cancer. Read more...
Not good option. Blood tests for Alpha feto protein and HCG may be positive in some testicular cancers. But such tests are not usually used as diagnostic tools, but to assess the progress of tumor and/or treatment. Read more...