40 doctors weighed in:

Is my family history relevant to my breast cancer diagnosis?

40 doctors weighed in
Dr. Steven Eisenberg
Internal Medicine - Hematology & Oncology
25 doctors agree

In brief: YES YES YES

Especially first degree relatives with breast cancer such as one mother or sisters (or father or brothers for that matter).
If one of these family members were diagnosed under age 50, that's also and important fact. Consider genetic counseling.

In brief: YES YES YES

Especially first degree relatives with breast cancer such as one mother or sisters (or father or brothers for that matter).
If one of these family members were diagnosed under age 50, that's also and important fact. Consider genetic counseling.
Dr. Steven Eisenberg
Dr. Steven Eisenberg
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1 comment
Dr. Michael Thompson
I agree w/ Dr. Eisenberg and would highlight that you should get genetic COUNSELING before reflexively getting genetic testing. The family member to test, how to test, and insurance implications need to be reviewed thoughtfully first.
Dr. Devon Webster
Internal Medicine - Oncology
7 doctors agree

In brief: Yes

If your mother, daughter, or sister had breast or ovarian cancer, especially before age 50, or if any man in your family had breast cancer, you may have a brca mutation.
If your family has a history of colon or endometrial cancer, you may have lynch syndrome. Tell your oncologist your history to see if genetic counseling and testing is needed. This is important information for your family.

In brief: Yes

If your mother, daughter, or sister had breast or ovarian cancer, especially before age 50, or if any man in your family had breast cancer, you may have a brca mutation.
If your family has a history of colon or endometrial cancer, you may have lynch syndrome. Tell your oncologist your history to see if genetic counseling and testing is needed. This is important information for your family.
Dr. Devon Webster
Dr. Devon Webster
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4 doctors agree

In brief: Yes

Women and men with a family history of breast cancer are at increased risk for developing breast cancer. Knowing other types of cancer in your family is also important.
Try this tool to learn more: http://www.Cancer.Gov/bcrisktool/.

In brief: Yes

Women and men with a family history of breast cancer are at increased risk for developing breast cancer. Knowing other types of cancer in your family is also important.
Try this tool to learn more: http://www.Cancer.Gov/bcrisktool/.
Dr. Stephen Saponaro
Dr. Stephen Saponaro
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Dr. Devon Webster
Internal Medicine - Oncology
3 doctors agree

In brief: Absolutely

Breast, colon, endometrial, or ovarian cancers are very relevant.
There are many cancer syndromes caused by different gene mutations. It's important to know the age your relatives were diagnosed, and the type of cancer. If necessary, your doctor may recommend genetic counseling for you or other family members based on the family pattern of cancers.

In brief: Absolutely

Breast, colon, endometrial, or ovarian cancers are very relevant.
There are many cancer syndromes caused by different gene mutations. It's important to know the age your relatives were diagnosed, and the type of cancer. If necessary, your doctor may recommend genetic counseling for you or other family members based on the family pattern of cancers.
Dr. Devon Webster
Dr. Devon Webster
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Dr. Theodore Caspe
Family Medicine
2 doctors agree

In brief: Yes

Family history of a certain type of breast cancer is important in risk stratification.
If their is a strong family history it is a good idea to get genetic counselling to determine risk for your children.

In brief: Yes

Family history of a certain type of breast cancer is important in risk stratification.
If their is a strong family history it is a good idea to get genetic counselling to determine risk for your children.
Dr. Theodore Caspe
Dr. Theodore Caspe
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Dr. Dean Giannone
Internal Medicine
1 doctor agrees

In brief: Yes

Women are more likely to have breast cancer if such already exists in the family.
Furthermore, there are some genetic cancer syndromes, brca1 and brca2, which make breast cancer an almost certainty.

In brief: Yes

Women are more likely to have breast cancer if such already exists in the family.
Furthermore, there are some genetic cancer syndromes, brca1 and brca2, which make breast cancer an almost certainty.
Dr. Dean Giannone
Dr. Dean Giannone
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Dr. Barbara A Majeroni
Family Medicine
1 doctor agrees

In brief: Yes

Some tendencies toward breast cancer run in families, although most women who get breast cancer have no known risk factors.

In brief: Yes

Some tendencies toward breast cancer run in families, although most women who get breast cancer have no known risk factors.
Dr. Barbara A Majeroni
Dr. Barbara A Majeroni
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Dr. Kenneth Cheng
Family Medicine
1 doctor agrees

In brief: Yes

A family history of breast cancer is relevant as there is a genetic pre-disposition when family members have also had breast cancer. This also should heighten the awareness of breast cancer in one's children as well.

In brief: Yes

A family history of breast cancer is relevant as there is a genetic pre-disposition when family members have also had breast cancer. This also should heighten the awareness of breast cancer in one's children as well.
Dr. Kenneth Cheng
Dr. Kenneth Cheng
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