Will my sex life be affected during treatment for vaginal cancer?

Probably. A cancer diagnosis and therapy may affect your interest in sex, as well as your physical experience. If your treatment includes surgery or radiation, your vagina (and potentially your vulva as well as the rest of your pelvis) are likely to be painful following treatment. You would probably find help by participating in cancer support groups to gain more information and obtain answers.
Vaginal cancer. Most likely at your age you have vaginal dysplasia not invasive cancer (unless you have a rare des cancer). After you have healed from the surgery for pre-cancer (dysplasia). You sex life should be quite close ton how it was before surgery.

Related Questions

What are the possible side effects of treatments for vaginal cancer?

Various... If you have to undergo chemotherapy +/- radiation therapy, there are various effects from these treatments. Chemotherapy side effects are various and common. There could be some scarring or scar tissue of the bladder/rectum/etc from radiation. From the surgery to remove vaginal cancer, the side effects could include bleeding, infection, also scarring, etc. Read more...
Vaginal Cancer . You might want to read this article about possible side effects of various kinds of treatment for vaginal cancer - http://www.Wcn.Org/articles/types_of_cancer/vaginal/treatment/what_to_do.Html. The side effects depend on whether you had radiotherapy, systemic chemotherapy, or intra-cervical radio implants. Read more...

What are the treatments for vaginal cancer?

Depends. It depends on the severity and size of the cancer. If the lesions are just pre-cancerous there are many many (from topical medications to excision to laser) options with careful observation of the area. If it is cancer, excision and then evaluation with a gyn- oncologist is recommended. Read more...
Depends on stage. Most all vaginal cancers are of the squamous cell carcinoma type. The treatment thereof depends on the stage (how advanced) of the cancer and the age/overall health of the patient. The nccn website provides guidelines that are updated periodically and are referenced by many oncologists (cancer doctors). A more detailed answer is beyond the scope of this format. Read more...