Is non-small cell lung cancer often a non-smokers cancer?

Yes. There are several types of non-small cell lung cancer. Typically squamous cell is associated with smoking. Adenocarcinoma isn't usually related to smoking.
Yes. The two variants of lung cancer that are non small cell (neuroendocrine) in origin are squamous and adenoCa of the lung. In the last decade, the squamous variant has taken a back seat and adenoCa unrelated to smoking has occupied more than 70% of the cases. The probable cause is a viral factor.

Related Questions

Can you tell me about non-small cell lung cancer can be non-smokers often?

Not often but happen. Many of the cases of lung cancer in non-smokers, whether small cell or other - squamous cell and adenocarcinoma - are in people exposed to high levels of second-hand smoke, as well as other pollutants, including toxic industrial exposures. Asbestos exposure is a cause of another kind of lung cancer- mesothelioma - which can happen with industrial or home exposure (old insulation). Read more...

What is non-small cell lung cancer?

One type . There are two broad categories of primary lung cancer called small cell and non small cell. Simply put, small cell is more aggressive, harder to treat and less common. Non small cell acts differently, can be treated with surgery and is the common smokers lung cancer. Read more...
See below. Non-small cell lung cancer is a type of lung cancer that grows more slowly and can be operated on if diagnosed at an early stage. It generally has a better prognosis than small-cell lung cancer, but that is depending on the stage and comorbidities. Read more...
Formerly, NSCLC . (sq & adeno) were treated with surgery, no chemo. Small cell was almost never treated with surgery and always chemotherapy. Now, chemotherapy is used in both. Once mediastinal nodes are +, chemo+rt is the standard, but many try to use surgery, especially if a lobectomy can be done. All are linked to smoking/tobacco. Read more...

Can people survive non small cell lung cancer?

Yes,depends stage. Stage 1 nsclc; surgical resection, appr70%5yrsurv stage2nsclc;surgery apprx. 30-35% 5 yr survival. Read more...

Can you tell me about non-small cell lung cancer?

Not enough space. Let's see: most common category of lung cancer, often but not always tobacco related, treated with surgery if possible but radiation and chemo are often used as well. I suggest you visit the national cancer institute website. It's has good info regarding all kinds of cancers. Read more...

What are the tests for non-small cell lung cancer?

Work Up. Includes: ct-chest thru liver and adrenals, head ct+/- contrast or mr, bone scan. Pet scan depends on ct findings, proximity of primary to medistinum. Read more...
Nsclc. First of all, a biopsy will need to be done to the lung mass/nodule not only to establish diagnosis but also to find the histology and genetic profile of the cancer. Then, complete staging work-up with pet/ ct scan need to be done to stage the cancer. The treatment will depend on the histology/molecular-genetic mutation status, stage, as well as overall condition and preference of a patient. Read more...
A few. Ct scan and pet scan are sensitive radiographic test. Percutaneous biopsy can provide a diagnosis. In some high risk patients with suspicious radiographs going straight to surgical resection is reasonable. Read more...

What's the prognosis for non small cell lung cancer?

5yr suvival bystage . Ia = 49% ib = 45% iia = 30% iib = 31% iiia = 14% iiib = 5% iv = 1% http://www.Cancer.Org/cancer/lungcancer-non-smallcell/detailedguide/non-small-cell-lung-cancer-survival-rates. Read more...
Stage. As noted by other physician, there are statistical based survival estimates by stage. But, each patient is an individual. It is most critical to speak with your cancer team. They will develop multi-disciplan approach and treatment plan and have a more personalized/individualized determination of reasonable prognosis. Read more...
See below. No way to say based on the your question. We would need to know what stage, molecular markers, what type, etc. Read more...

Could you explain what is non small cell lung cancer?

One type of lung. Cancer. It is not easy to explain. There are multiple subtypes within in this type. These are due to smoking and tend to spread locally as compared to early spread through blood for small cell cancer. See this site for more info. http://www.cancer.gov/cancertopics/pdq/treatment/non-small-cell-lung/patient/page1. Read more...
Classification. Lung cancer can be classified into two broad classes: small cell and non- small cell. Since small cell is almost always non- surgical, it is important to make the distinction. Non- small cell can include squamous cell, adenocarcinoma, large cell, neuroendocrine, broncho-alveolar, etc. Read more...

If you get non-small cell lung cancer, how do you feel?

You may feel normal! Many people present with vague symptoms or none at all if the cancer is caught in an early stage as an incidental finding on a scan done for another reason. The common symptoms associated with something going on in the chest are chronic cough (that may be productive of some blood), shortness of breath, chest pain or discomfort with a deep breath, fatigue, weight loss. Read more...
It depends; Unfortunately lung cancer is usually diagnosed in more advanced stages because it can be silent. Depending on the region it involves, symptoms could varry from cough, weight loss, shortness of breath, coughing up blood, affecting voice quality. If cancer is found incidentally in early stages( patient not symptomatic and cancer found incidentally), the cure rate can be excellent. Read more...
Depends. You could be asymptomatic-and the cancer was found accidentally during other routine work up for instance. In early stage, many times- it may not give you any significant problems. Symptom can include chronic cough, chest pain, coughing up blood, shortness of breath, weight loss, bony pain etc. Symptoms will be more in advanced stage. Read more...