Is it weird to make a whooping sound?

"Weird"? It might be surprising, if you're not expecting a "whoop" to come out of you when it does -- and could possibly feel weird. The question is whether these are voluntary "whoops", which can express joy or excitement, or involuntary ones. If it's the latter, it may be a type of tic disorder. And if this troubles you, you could consult with your primary care doctor, or a psychiatrist. Good luck.

Related Questions

What does a whooping cough actually sound like?

A seal barking. The whoop of whooping cough is caused by a rapid rush of air into a flexable baby windpipe. The closest sound in nature is a seal barking, which is produced as they force air out and vibrate their windpipe. Read more...
"Paroxysmal": Very rapid cough-cough-cough-cough-cough [many many times without taking a breath] - then, running out of air, a huge gasping intake of breath that sounds like a "whoop" (hence the name). Then, almost instantly, starting over. Read more...

I had whooping cough as a child. I have been coughing (barking sound) for the past 3 days, producing green secretions. Do I need to see Dr?

Coughing. You don't have whooping cough but you probably have a lung infection so see your doctor. Read more...
Probably infection. Your whooping cough and current cough have no real relationship Recently there have been many several cases of viral respiratory bronchitis that developed into a secondary bacterial infection causing one to produce greenish yellow secretions. Often adults may not have a fever but the cough does have a barking quality .if you have secreations inform your doctor . You may need to be treated wi t. Read more...

My 6 week old daughter has been making a whooping sound since birth, mainly when she gets excited. No coughing is involved. But is this normal?

Probably . I would call your baby's pediatrician and get that checked. The best case scenario is that such noises are related to floppy airway (which improves with time) or it could also be something more concerning (especially since you said "whooping sound"). Some infants who are not fully immunized are not protected for common childhood diseases. Read more...
Rubbery airways. Infants have airways that are very flexible that become stiffer as they age.In some this is quite noticeable, particularly if excited as they draw air in and vibrate the walls.The squeak or croup can increase after birth as the become more active but tends to fade after 6 mo. An evaluation by an ENT that can visualize the airway can confirm the issue. Read more...
Larygeomalacia. What you are describing could be layrgeomalacia, which softening of the airway. It tends to get worse if the child is having a cold. It improves when your child turns 9-12 months. Read more...

My one week old daughter just coughed should I be concerned? It didn't have a whooping sound nor did it sound like a smokers cough. No high temperature

Minor cough normal. Newborns clear secretions a little different than grown-ups and even older kids as they don't know how to blow their noses, spit out mucous, etc. In the drier winter weather, the body responds by making extra mucous. To make sure she doesn't choke on it, she will occasionally both sneeze and cough. Don't be afraid to use the bulb syringe they gave you in the hospital to clean out the mucous. Read more...
Babies cough. And sneeze, and make all kinds of noises. I understand, especially with new parents, that anything out of the ordinary can be scary, but a cough can occur with a temporary aspiration of saliva. If it is persistent, if the baby has a temperature, if there are breathing problems, then see your pediatrician. If not, enjoy your baby more and worry less! Read more...

My child makes a whooping sound when he breathes in. Does that mean he has asthma?

No. Whooping after a severe coughing spell may be a sign of pertussis, or whooping cough, it is not a sound made by a child with asthma. Read more...
No. If your baby is truly making a whooping sound when he breathes in, he might have pertussis, or whooping cough. Pertussis causes episodes of coughing fits, often accompanied with a whoop upon breathing in. These babies have a hard time breathing and eating. Pertussis can lead to apnea, in which the baby stops breathing. You should see a doctor immediately if your baby is whooping. Read more...
No. (not necessarily). Inspiratory "whooping" or high pitched sounds with breathing may be seen with respiratory tract infections (rti) in infancy. Asthma typically presents with expiratory wheezing and chronic cough. Asthma is a difficult diagnosis to make in young children since many children will wheeze with rti's but not develop persistent asthma. Speak to your doctor if these symptoms persist. Read more...
No. Any child who is making noises (other than just a stuffy nose) while breathing should see the doctor to find out the reason for the noise. If such a child is having trouble breathing, or looks very uncomfortable, parents must call 911 for an ambulance and oxygen. Asthma sounds are "wheezing" noises, which generally occur as a child breaths out. Read more...
Yes. Whooping sound when baby breathes in does not mean asthma. Nasal congestion and laryngomalacia may make a whooping sound when baby breathes in. Usually with laryngomalacia babies are happy but noisy. Asthma gives you a sound (wheezing) during expiration and usually causes severe cough, breathing difficulty. If nasal congestion use saline nasal drops/suction. Read more...
No. The whooping sound is the rapid breath in after a severe bout of successive coughing. Whooping cough is an infection and is not related to asthma which often causes a wheezing sound when breathing out. Cough by the way is the most common symptom of asthma, so if in doubt have your child checked by your doctor. Read more...
No. Traditionally, the "whooping" sound describes pertussis, or whooping cough. Inspiratory (breathing in) sounds are usually associated with upper airway swelling, most commonly croup. Asthma is usually a long "haaa" sound when breathing out, but can be heard on inspiration if severe. Children with breathing difficulties should of course always be brought in for medical evaluation. Read more...
No. Asthma causes wheezing, which is a high pitched sound on exhalation (breathing out), not inhalation (breathing in). When there are sounds made with inhalation, it usually means that there is a narrowing of the upper airways- in the larynx and trachea. There are many possible causes for this, including croup and laryngomalacia. If your child is having problems breathing, call your pediatrician. Read more...
No. Noise when kids breathe in is called "stridor" or whooping. Examples are croup and whooping cough. Noise in their lungs when they breathe out is usually called "wheezing" and is what we hear with asthma or with certain viral infections that cause wheezing only during the infection(cold) itself. Both noises should be heard by an md, however. Causes range from annoying to serious. Read more...
No. Asthma is usually a breathing out noise, except in its more severe form when patients wheeze breathing in and out. All abnormal breathing should be evaluated by your doctor-other conditions to consider include inspiratory stridor from croup, tracheomalacia, whooping cough, or a foreign object in the windpipe. Read more...

My son started coughing real bad and he coughs till he throws up. Nights are worse, he'll cough non stop. Does this sound like whooping cough?

Could be. Anyone having a coughing fit can cough until they throw up - the medical term is vomiting after coughing - post tussive vomiting. If your child is not fully vaccinated, please check in with your doctor right away. Whooping cough coughs long and hard - and you may not hear the characteristic "whoop.". It is very contagious. Read more...