How is intestinal cancer diagnosed?

If you mean. Colon cancer, colonoscopy, ct scans are part of the diagnostic workup if colon cancer is suspected. Intestinal cancer, if you are talking of small bowel cancer would be with small bowel xrays or pill endoscopy.
Endoscopy & biopsy. The intestinal tract includes the esophagus, stomach, small intestine, appendix, colon, and rectum. Cancer in each part is diagnosed quite differently, so please try to specify a bit more if you are still curious. Basically, all can be diagnosed by inserting a flexible camera (endoscope) and taking tissue samples (biopsies). Under the microscope, cancer can be diagnosed.

Related Questions

What is intestinal cancer?

SB, colon, rectum. Gastrointestinal (GI) cancer can include anything from the mouth to the anus, but "intestinal" can be characterized as including the small bowel (sb), colon (large bowel), and rectum. Read more...
Varies. Gastrointestinal cancer is most often a type called adenocarcinoma. It can affect the stomach sometimes, small intestine rarely, and colon (large intestine) most often. It is usually treated with combination therapy with surgery, medical oncology such as chemotherapy, and sometimes radiation therapy. It does run in some families. Read more...

Who gets intestinal cancer?

Anyone. Large intestine cancer, more commonly called colon cancer, is the 3rd most common cancer killer in both men and women. The vast majority of cases occur after age 50, but it can occassionally occur in younger adults. A family history of colon cancer increases your risk, but the majority of cases occur in people with no family history. Small intestine (or small bowel) cancer is rare. Read more...

What’s new in intestinal cancer research?

Too broad. I think everyone is skipping this question because it is just too broad. There are many research trials and programs going on across the country for intestinal cancers, but there are so many different types of this cancer. If you can narrow this down...Someone may be abe to help you. Read more...

What are the tests for intestinal cancer?

Mutliple. Tough question, since there is small and large intestinal cancer. Commonly, we do endoscopies to look at the lining of the intestines. A colonoscopy is done to look at the large intestine and the lower small intestine. An egd (esophagogastroduodenoscopy) is done to evaluate the esophagus, stomach and upper small intestine. A ct scan can also be performed, as well as some blood tests. Read more...

What are the symptoms of intestinal cancer?

Depends. The intestinal tract includes the esophagus, stomach, small intestine, appendix, colon, and rectum. Cancer in each part is manifests quite differently, so please try to specify a bit more if you are still curious. Generally, the symptoms include, pain, nausea, vomiting, weight loss, and changes in bowel habits. Read more...
Colon cancer. Change in bowel habits , rectal bleeding, abdominal discomfort or bloating. These are nonspecific symptoms and can be the same symptoms of other disorders. Should you experience this symptomatology , you should see a colon and rectal specialist or gastroenterologist. Read more...

What are the chances of surviving an intestinal cancer?

Depends on stage. And type of cancer. Colon is the commonest site of intestinal cancers and early colon cancer has an excellent survival rate. The rates decline with advancing stage. Five year survival rates by stage are: 1 ~ 93%, ; 2 ~ 80%, 3~60%, 4 ~ 5%. Read more...

What are the consequences of intestinal cancer in a child?

See below. A variety of consequences which include intestinal obstruction (nausea, vomiting), nutritional deficiencies, pain, bleeding, perforation (rupture of the intestine). Cancers of the intestine are serious and need to be evaluated by specialists. Read more...

What is the definition or description of: Intestinal cancer?

Lesion in mucosa. Lesions of bowel,especially colon, now believed to arise in a field effect in the mucosa of the bowel, small and large. A virus such as polyoma enters the mucosa and begins tansformation first with gene alterations leading to immortality and then to normal appearing cells beginning to produce immunogenic protein. One focus transforms faster to result in a clinical lesion while others are dormant. Read more...